“Take it to the next level!”, by Thomas (Tim) Mitchinson


In this article, Thomas (Tim) Mitchinson, a colleague and a columnist who writes on the relationship between thought, spirituality and health, shares, his unique point of view on how elevating our thinking can produce favorable results in both our mental and physical health. Tim acknowledges along with a Health Examiner, researchers and the subsequent findings, that taking emotions to the ‘higher level’ (a spiritual, moral level) not only makes us happy, it has been found to improve our health and mental well-being. If each of us expressed more compassion and love toward one another- perhaps this paradigm shift could uplift the world to a ‘higher level’. See what you think!

go-to-the-next-level-1We are in the middle of football season and the major league baseball post season.  We have seen athletes exceed beyond “personal bests”; reminding me of Nike’s campaign: “Take it to the next level”!  To me, it’s all about breaking through our own limitations and doing or being the best we can.

This doesn’t just apply to college or professional athletes.  The readers of this paper have found in their own lives ways to “take it to the next level.”  Maybe they are walking further each morning than they did the previous day, swimming farther, or lifting heavier weights.

But I think there are many ways to take life to the next level.  How about embracing a new level in the good emotions we cultivate and express in our lives?  Maybe we can express more affection, compassion and gratitude than we have in the past.  Why should we do that? Well, one reason is simply that it makes us feel good. Additionally, it’s quite possible that doing those things can have a significant impact on our health.

Kory Floyd, an associate professor at Arizona State University’s Hugh Downs School of Human Communication has studied the effect of affection on one’s health.  “Being affectionate is good for you,” Floyd says. “Affection can be a simple, non-pharmaceutical, cheap way to reduce stress.” Floyd has found that there are direct associations between being an affectionate person and a lower risk of depression and stress.  “Highly affectionate people tend to have better mental health and less stress. They also react to stress better,” he stated.

Please click here to read the entire article

#wellbeing #spirituality #prayer

Kate is interested in sharing blogs about the impact of prayer and spirituality on our health written by her colleagues.  As a Christian Science practitioner and teacher, Kate has experienced the power of prayer in her life as well as in the lives of others.  She is the media and legislative contact for Christian Science in Maryland. Kate can be contacted through Twitter @CScomMaryland and email at: maryland@compub.org