Healing Power of Spiritual Stillness, by Valerie Minard

In this article, Valerie Minard, a colleague and a writer that focuses on the connection between consciousness, spirituality and health, explores the effect that stillness has on quieting our thought.  Having daily periods of stillness has been proven to improve our health and our well-being.  She shares her personal experience and spiritual perception on just how stillness opens our thought to unique answers to questions and challenges.  Valerie explains how to obtain this spiritual stillness where ever we are and whenever we want or need to.

The Healing Power of StillnessI recently ran into an acquaintance of mine, we’ll call Kate, while she was running along a bike path. Kate told me that she first started running to stay in shape. But, now over the years, she’s found that running not only clears her head but she’s able to resolve problems just by quiet listening as she runs.  She rarely has time to do this with her active family, but 20 minutes into her run she’ll find herself making mental notes about who she should speak to, what to say, and answers to problems.  Sometimes, she’ll even run into that person by accident, as if the meeting was pre-arranged.

This coincides with what researchers at Bar Ilan University in Israel have found.  According to PhD student, Shira Baror, “When you reduce mental [stress], people have a tendency to avoid the ‘obvious solution’ and instead access unique thought in their mind.”

Some people think of this just as a function of the human mind or subconscious.  But for others, accessing that “unique thought in their mind,” might be thought of as prayer, in which all true, enlightened thought comes from God, the divine Mind.  In fact, when I mentioned this to Kate, she agreed.  Even though she doesn’t think of herself as a “praying person,” she felt her quiet time running was her time to commune with God.

Perhaps that’s why the Bible tells us, “When thou prayest, enter into thy closet, and when thou hast shut thy door, pray to thy Father which is in secret; and thy Father which seeth in secret shall reward thee openly.”  Going into the closet doesn’t require a small room but a means to get mentally still.  Nor is it simply to empty our minds.  But it does require shutting out distractions and fearful thinking so we can make room to receive thoughts from God and listen to the “still small voice” within consciousness, as described in the Bible.

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#wellbeing #spirituality #prayer

Kate is interested in sharing blogs about the impact of prayer and spirituality on our health written by her colleagues.  As a Christian Science practitioner and teacher, Kate has experienced the power of prayer in her life as well as in the lives of others.  She is the media and legislative contact for Christian Science in Maryland. Kate can be contacted through Twitter @CScomMaryland and email at: maryland@compub.org