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Fasting out of Cancer, by Karla Hackney

Posted by on May 25, 2015 in Blog | 0 comments

Photo by © Glowimages; models are used for illustrative purposes

Photo by © Glowimages; models are used for illustrative purposes

Karla Hackney, a spiritual writer, published blogger and colleague, discusses the viability and history of fasting from food as a cure for cancer and many other maladies.  She shares her own experience with a different kind of fasting-a mental and spiritual fasting that has been proven to be an effective practice in healing.  Join me and find out what Karla has to reveal on this enlightening possibility.

Fasting – it’s trendy right now, promising everything from weight loss to a cure for cancer. Fasting hearkens back to a variety of ancient traditions and, in some, carries with it the promise of spiritual clarity and physical healing.  In numerous Biblical accounts, for example, fasting was practiced in deep times of need (Job), in times of mourning and as intercessory prayer (Nehemiah and Daniel after Jerusalem had been desolated) and in times of much needed spiritual strength (Jesus fasts forty days in the wilderness and returns to heal the masses).

Although the writings are ancient, to me these accounts don’t feel so far from our modern headlines.

The call for fasting, old or new, remains a part of our world’s culture. And modern medicine is increasingly trying to determine what actual health value it might have.

For some, a prolonged period in which one abstains from solid food supports mental acuteness, bodily cleansing, and even physical healing.  One recent study, published in the March 30, 2015 Oncotarget, reports positive lab results for cancer victims associated with short fasts.

Please click here to read the entire article

cancer, fasting, incurable, Prayer, spirituality

Kate is interested in blogging about the impact of prayer and spirituality on our health from her experience as a Christian Science practitioner. She is the media, legislative and public contact for Christian Science in the state of Maryland. Contact Kate on Twitter: @CscomMaryland, on Facebook: Kate Johnson CS, or email:  maryland@compub.org

What bill of (health) goods are you buying into? by Wendy Margolese

Posted by on May 18, 2015 in Blog | 0 comments

With the advancement of new technologies – over testing and over diagnosis of disease have become a growing concern in Canada, the United States and other parts of the world.  Needless and potentially harmful screening for diseases is expensive and needs to be considered and looked at more carefully.  Wendy Margolese, a published blogger, spiritual thinker and colleague, gives us important information and possible alternatives-even spiritual remedies-in combating this growing global problem.  Join me and read what spiritual insight Wendy has to share.

Photo by © Glowimages; models are used for illustrative purposes

Photo by © Glowimages; models are used for illustrative purposes

Stories abound of people who were ‘sold a bill of goods’, meaning that you did not receive what you thought you were purchasing.

Excessive use of all the new technologies for peering into the human body may be a bill of health goods that warrants a second, more discerning, look. Canadians are undergoing more tests today than we did 20 years ago – with no obvious improvement in our health.

In his book “Overdiagnosed: Making People Sick in the Pursuit of Health”, Dr. Gilbert Welch offers the insight that ‘widespread screening of people for health issues does not promote health; it promotes disease. People suffer from more anxiety about their health, from drug side effects, from complications of surgery.’

And, Dr. Iona Heath may have uncovered why we buy into excessive medical testing. She writes in a recent edition of the British Medical Journal: ‘We need to admit …the very real and dangerous conditions of anxiety and worry that are affecting this country and the world…that cannot be satiated by countless unremarkable medical investigations or needless and potentially harmful and expensive medication.’

Please click here to read the entire article

#mentalheath #spirituality #mentalwellbeing

Kate is interested in blogging about the impact of prayer and spirituality on our health from her experience as a Christian Science practitioner. She is the media, legislative and public contact for Christian Science in the state of Maryland. Contact Kate on Twitter: @CscomMaryland, on Facebook: Kate Johnson CS, or email:  maryland@compub.org

Research shows that love & emotional support goes a long way toward healing the hurts life deals out.

Posted by on May 11, 2015 in Blog | Comments Off on Research shows that love & emotional support goes a long way toward healing the hurts life deals out.

Photo by © Glow images;  models are used for illustrative purposes

Photo by © Glow images;  models are used for illustrative purposes

A recent Carnegie Mellon study found that social support-such as hugs- actively decreases the risk of developing infections- like the flu.  Could the comfort of being loved be a palpable remedy for preventing or lessening the effects of illness?  Cynthia Barnett, a spiritual thinker, writer and colleague, shares her own experience with the power of love to mend and to heal.  Join me and read what Cynthia has learned about the healing nature of love. 

There once was a boy with a boo-boo. He’d been hurt on the playground and came running, crying, to his teacher. Hugging him gently, needing no details, she simply murmured, “I know, Ramon, I know.” The boy’s tears stopped. He was quiet for a moment and then went happily back to play.

What happened to the boo-boo? Psychologist Dr. Haim Ginott didn’t really say, except that the unconditional love and unquestioning acceptance of the teacher were apparently enough to comfort the boy and override any sense of hurt. Dr. Ginott, best-selling author of Between Parent and Child, was convinced of the power of love to help and heal. He wrote and spoke about such true stories many decades ago.

So it’s not surprising that a recent article in Spirituality and Health  (January 6, 2015) makes the same point, but with Carnegie Mellon research to back it up. This research did not involve boo-boos and children, however. It looked at 404 adults’ experiences with stress, conflict and contagion when they received the loving support of friends or community. Specifically, these men and women were asked how many conflicts they’d experienced each day for 14 days, as well as how many hugs. They also agreed to be given nasal drops with a common cold virus as a protective or preventive ingredient.

Please click here to read the entire article

Love comforts, Love Quiets, Love heals

Kate is interested in blogging about the impact of prayer and spirituality on our health from her experience as a Christian Science practitioner. She is the media, legislative and public contact for Christian Science in the state of Maryland. Contact Kate on Twitter: @CscomMaryland, on Facebook: Kate Johnson CS, or email:  maryland@compub.org. 

Can we be scared into being healthier?

Posted by on May 4, 2015 in Blog | Comments Off on Can we be scared into being healthier?

Research-although not conclusive-is pointing in the direction of using less fear tactics to utilizing more positive forms of reinforcement to encourage people to make better decisions about their health. Eric Nelson, a syndicated writer, spiritual explorer and colleague, offers a different-more spiritual method for breaking the cycle of negative thinking which may culminate in making bad health choices. Join me and find out what spiritual insight Eric has to share.

Photo by © Glow images;  models are used for illustrative purposes

Photo by © Glow images;  models are used for illustrative purposes

Ever since the first ‘dietary intervention’ in the Garden of Eden, even the threat of death has not proven to be an effective motivator to making healthy choices.

Anyone over 40 likely remembers the TV ad.

A man standing next to a kitchen stove picks up an egg.

“This is your brain,” he says. “This is drugs,” he continues, pointing to the piping hot skillet in front of him.

Then, after cracking the egg into the skillet, he says, “This is your brain on drugs.”

The message couldn’t have been clearer. But was it effective? Yes. And no. Although drug use among adolescents in the U.S. dropped from 3.2 million to 1.3 million between 1985 and 1992 (this particular ad began running in 1987), just a year later the number went back up to 2.1 million.

Although the jury is still out as to whether such scare tactics provide any lasting benefit – not just in terms of drug use, but also for other health-related choices we make – the scales appear to be tilting in favor of an approach that involves fewer sticks and more carrots.

Please click here to read the entire article

#fearless  #spirituality

Kate is interested in blogging about the impact of prayer and spirituality on our health from her experience as a Christian Science practitioner. She is the media, legislative and public contact for Christian Science in the state of Maryland. Contact Kate on Twitter: @CscomMaryland, on Facebook: Kate Johnson CS, or email:  maryland@compub.org. 

Debra Chew: #SpiritualMillennials

Posted by on Apr 27, 2015 in Blog | Comments Off on Debra Chew: #SpiritualMillennials

•© GLOW IMAGES omodels are used for illustrative purposes

• © GLOW IMAGES
o models are used for illustrative purposes

Debra Chew, a published writer, spiritual thinker and colleague, explores the spiritual potential of the generation referred to as the”millennials” for handling stress and life challenges. Perhaps they have discovered the harmony and renewal that spiritual awareness and/or communing with God can bring. Join me in reading Debra’s informative and insightful article on the power and potential of prayer.  Prayer that is always available and can relieve the stress and challenges of life.

That group we call the “millennials” – the first generation to have had internet during their formative years – is reportedly the most studied generation ever.  Those researchers who refer to them as the most diverse aggregation of young people so far also calls them the most stressed-out generation ever!  What does that mean for the future health of this “most educated generation” to date?

According to the American Psychological Association’s annual Stress in America Survey, released earlier this year, the health effects of stress are a growing concern across this group of young adults.  Their stress is causing not only irritability, anxiety and lack of motivation, it has also been linked to health problems.

At the same time, other reports indicate millennials are more likely than other generations to deal with stress using non-traditional methods….reportedly, twice as likely as other generations to meditate (commune with a higher power) to try to relieve stress.  While some are secular in their approach to meditation, many are seeking some sense of the Divine as a relief from stress.  And, with college finals fast approaching and stress awareness month – April – upon us, many millennials could find relief from the pressures of their school or work day by communing with God.

Please click here to read the entire article

#SpiritualMillennials

Kate is interested in blogging about the impact of prayer and spirituality on our health from her experience as a Christian Science practitioner. She is the media, legislative and public contact for Christian Science in the state of Maryland. Contact Kate on Twitter: @CscomMaryland, on Facebook: Kate Johnson CS, or email:  maryland@compub.org. 

PTSD Treatment: Symptoms or Souls?

Posted by on Apr 20, 2015 in Blog | Comments Off on PTSD Treatment: Symptoms or Souls?

Photo by © Glow images

Photo by © Glow images

With the influx of returning veterans suffering from post-traumatic stress syndrome (PTSD), researchers are looking for alternative methods of treatment.  New research has uncovered that the treatment of PTSD is more effective when it is tailored to each person on an individualized basis.  Richard Geiger, a spiritual thinker, writer, star patch blogger and colleague, shares his insight on the development of effective alternative treatments such as, meditation and spirituality.  Let’s join Richard and find out what he has discovered about this unconventional approach and its effectiveness in the treatment of PTSD.

Richard Geiger follows the VA’s search for non-drug PTSD treatment of symptoms. Its research points to holistic treatment of the individual

After the showing of “American Sniper,” the audience around me at our local theater—perhaps like at yours—remained silent. It went on for a some very long minutes before people quietly rose and shuffled out.

I think we were sharing heartbreak.

We were sharing an urgency for dominion over combat trauma called post-traumatic stress syndrome (PTSD). The number of affected veterans and families is growing. And, as many dedicated care-givers work to find solutions, one fact is emerging: one method of treatment does not fit everyone.

Please click here to read the entire article

#spirituality  #PTSD

Kate is interested in blogging about the impact of prayer and spirituality on our health from her experience as a Christian Science practitioner. She is the media, legislative and public contact for Christian Science in the state of Maryland. Contact Kate on Twitter: @CscomMaryland, on Facebook: Kate Johnson CS, or email:  maryland@compub.org. 

Owning Our Health: Defeating Ageism with Grace

Posted by on Apr 13, 2015 in Blog | Comments Off on Owning Our Health: Defeating Ageism with Grace

Anna Bowness Park, a spiritual thinker, syndicated writer and colleague, shares her insight on the discrimination of ageism in Canada.  Please join me in reading this enlightening article – as we too have this same type of tolerated discrimination in the U.S. today.  Let’s see what Anna has to report on this growing social problem and explore a more spiritual remedy that is always available.

Photo by © Glow images

Photo by © Glow images

Everyone has the right to know that they have something to contribute

The recent movie, “The Second Best Marigold Hotel,” stars a cast of my favourite older British actors playing the roles of seniors living in India. To me, like the first movie about the Marigold Hotel, this one is not so much about age as it is about life. Whether it is the cranky but wise Muriel (played by Maggie Smith), hilariously dressing down an American waiter on the proper way to serve tea, or Sonny, the young hotel manager (Dev Patel), whose insecurity about his upcoming nuptials threatens to derail the wedding, it’s life in all its tender, poignant and funny moments that is examined, against a backdrop of the color and vibrancy of India.

It’s a shame, though, that the movie is marketed to the silver tsunami crowd, complete with some subtle jokes on ageing. It could so easily have been a great opportunity to more vigorously confront the problem of ageism in our society, as well as celebrate the innate energy, capabilities and wisdom of people of all ages.

Ageism is the most tolerated form of discrimination in Canada. A poll two years ago found that eight out of ten Canadians believe that seniors aged 75 or older are less important and more ignored than younger generations. Additionally, six out of ten seniors felt they had been treated unfairly because of their age. The report concluded that “ageism is not an old person’s problem, it is a societal problem.”

Please click here to read the entire article

Tags:  ageingAgeismdiscriminationEllen Langerprejudice

Kate is interested in blogging about the impact of prayer and spirituality on our health from her experience as a Christian Science practitioner. She is the media, legislative and public contact for Christian Science in the state of Maryland. Contact Kate on Twitter: @CscomMaryland, on Facebook: Kate Johnson CS, or email:  maryland@compub.org. 

Music Therapy Offers Glimpse of Man’s Innate Harmony, Tim Mitchinson

Posted by on Apr 6, 2015 in Blog | Comments Off on Music Therapy Offers Glimpse of Man’s Innate Harmony, Tim Mitchinson

Photo by © Glow Images

Photo by © Glow Images

Medical studies indicate that music therapy is beneficial in the treatment of disease.  Perhaps the connection with music establishes more than a pleasant chemical reaction- it may be a link to something much more spiritual.  Could this spiritual connection be what heals? Tim Mitchinson, a spiritual explorer, syndicated writer and colleague, shares his personal experience with the relationship between music and health.  Let’s see what Tim has discovered.

Among a host of “out of the mainstream” new therapies for treating or alleviating chronic ills, music therapy shows promise.  Hospitals and nursing homes across the country are adding music to their therapeutics as a way to reduce fear and stress.

The next big question is of course “Why does music do this?” Professional health-musician Ed Dulaney told me, “Music helps individuals move out of the cesspool of self-pity and into the ability to handle the issues they face.”

Looking even deeper, are the beneficial effects of music more than a chemical response in the brain? Does music in fact connect us to some larger, universal consciousness that aligns us with greater harmony?

For centuries, experts from many fields have looked beyond the body for answers to establishing a healthy life.  Many have found that when someone finds a connection to the divine, he feels an inner peace which can restore health.

Please click here to read the entire article

#spirituality  #musictherapy

 Kate is interested in blogging about the impact of prayer and spirituality on our health from her experience as a Christian Science practitioner. She is the media, legislative and public contact for Christian Science in the state of Maryland. Contact Kate on Twitter: @CscomMaryland, on Facebook: Kate Johnson CS, or email:  maryland@compub.org. 

You Can’t Google Intuition

Posted by on Mar 30, 2015 in Blog | Comments Off on You Can’t Google Intuition

Photo by © Glow mages

Photo by © Glow mages

Eric Nelson, a spiritual thinker, syndicated writer and colleague, poses the question-can Google or any internet search engine really be a reliable discerner of the truth?   The internet purports variable aspects of the truth at best.  Maybe listening to a more intrinsic search engine is a more viable path.  Could spiritual intuition be a better discerner of truth?  You decide after reading what Eric has to share.

Ever since Pilate asked Jesus, “What is truth?” we’ve been trying to figure out the answer. Is it possible that the mother of all search engines has finally hit on a solution, or should we be relying on something less tech-oriented?

During a familiar and oft-quoted exchange just before his crucifixion, Jesus is asked by Pontius Pilate that singular question that continues to reverberate some two thousand years later:

“What is truth?”

Apparently, the folks at Google are wondering the same thing.

In an effort to bring us all closer to an answer, they have devised a nifty new search mechanism that ranks websites based on their credibility, not popularity. Instead of counting the number of links to a particular page, the system instead measures the amount of incorrect information it detects.

How is that possible?

Click here to read the entire article

#truthfulgrowth  #spirituality

Kate is interested in blogging about the impact of prayer and spirituality on our health from her experience as a Christian Science practitioner. She is the media, legislative and public contact for Christian Science in the state of Maryland. Contact Kate on Twitter: @CscomMaryland, on Facebook: Kate Johnson CS, or email:  maryland@compub.org. 

 

 

Being a Good Samaritan to the Mentally Ill and their Families

Posted by on Mar 23, 2015 in Blog | Comments Off on Being a Good Samaritan to the Mentally Ill and their Families

Photo by © Glow mages

Photo by © Glow mages

Many of us have had a brush with mental illness sometime during our life.  It may have been with a relative, a friend, or even have dealt with a mental illness ourselves.  Tim Mitchinson, a spiritual thinker, syndicated writer and colleague, shares his own and others stories of success in treating people who have been diagnosed with mental illness in a kinder, more empathetic way.  Let’s read what unique remedy Tim has discovered using his spiritual insight.

Most of the readers of the Peoria Journal-Star can recall the parable of the Good Samaritan. Finding a man who was attacked by thieves and left to die, this Samaritan stopped and helped the abandoned victim. He looked beyond religious and cultural prejudices of his day and saw a fellow human being who needed help. He bandaged his wounds, picked him up and took him to a place where he could rest and recover.

Individuals, families, community and faith-based groups are among those who are called upon today to be Good Samaritans to those dealing with all sorts of health issues.

“No one should ever be defined by an illness,” stated Angela Adkins, Executive Director for DuPage NAMI, an affiliate of the National Alliance on Mental Illness. NAMI has been operating as a Good Samaritan to the mentally ill and their families for 30 years. “We provide support, education and advocacy for individuals and their families who are living with mental illness,” Adkins explained.

Please click here to read the entire article

#mentalhealth #well-being

Kate is interested in blogging about the impact of prayer and spirituality on our health from her experience as a Christian Science practitioner. She is the media, legislative and public contact for Christian Science in the state of Maryland. Contact Kate on Twitter: @CscomMaryland, on Facebook: Kate Johnson CS, or email:  maryland@compub.org.