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To view, or not to view “50 Shades Of Grey”

Posted by on Feb 23, 2015 in Blog | 0 comments

Photo by © Glow Images

Photo by © Glow Images

The new, controversial blockbuster film, “Fifty Shades of Grey” which opened in time for Valentine’s Day, introduces sadomasochistic, sensual gratification that some say is devoid of love or romance, to the mainstream audience.  See what you think after reading this article by Tony Lobl, a spiritual thinker, writer, lecturer and colleague, examines and shares his and others concerns and presents a more metaphysical view on how to achieve true happiness and fulfillment.  Join me and read what Tony has to share on this thought provoking topic.

As we weigh up whether this Valentine’s Day blockbuster is worth, or worthy of, the ticket price it might be worth asking: “What is happiness?”

The fervour surrounding Fifty Shades of Grey reached fever pitch with the Valentine’s eve release of one of the raciest storylines ever likely to achieve blockbuster status.

Yet it hasn’t all been roses for the producers film has its detractors – ranging from religious leaders and domestic abuse campaigners to anti-porn activists. And they are making their voices heard.

For instance, a creative social media campaign has been launched with a hashtag urging movie-goers to skip the film and instead donate their money to shelters and agencies that support abused women. (#50DollarsNot50Shades).

Please click here to read the entire article

Kate is interested in blogging about the impact of prayer and spirituality on our health from her experience as a Christian Science practitioner. She is the media, legislative and public contact for Christian Science in the state of Maryland. Contact Kate on Twitter: @CscomMaryland, on Facebook: Kate Johnson CS, or email:  maryland@compub.org. 

 

 

 

 

Improve your Health? Break the chain of the “busy-ness trap”

Posted by on Feb 16, 2015 in Blog | 0 comments

Are you caught up in the busyness trap?

Are you caught up in the busyness trap?

Everyone seems to be busy, busy, busy these day.  Ask someone how they are and the response is usually, “I am so busy, I don’t have time for anything but work.”  What are we all busy doing?  What about our lives makes us feel we need to be busy all the time?

As I was getting my nails done recently I asked my manicurist the simple question.  “Do you feel like your life is too busy?”

I was curious because I had just finished reading an article, “Getting out of the ‘busy-ness trap’,” by Martha Ross of the San Jose Mercury News.  She was writing about a well-known author, sociologist and happiness expert, Christine Carter.  Evidently her life, too, was packed at one time with “a long list of high-profiled commitments” along with all the duties of being a single mom.

According to the article, “she was miserable and had fallen into what she calls the ‘busy-ness trap.”  Eventually she found herself in the emergency room, “exhausted, dehydrated and suffering from a fever and a kidney infection.”  She had to cancel a keynote address she was scheduled to give at the end of that week.

In order to stay healthy and happy she knew she had to reorganize and re-prioritize her days and her life.  This experience and the research she did on the issue of “busyness” led her to write a book, “The Sweet Spot:  How to Find Your Groove at Home and Work.” According to the article, she explains how to organize and prioritize your time, stay healthy and take time for fun.

Back to the manicurist scenario:  To my surprise, not only did she respond but so did the neighboring women, two additional manicurists and their clients.

“Yes,” they all said, and each one launched into her individual scenarios as to why she was so busy.  One by one they described how much they have to do and how they go from one activity to another without actually finishing anything.  Then at the end of the day, they wonder where the day went and why they still have so much to do!

I could identify with them as I had, at one point, found myself doing the same thing.  Also, I spent a lot of time during the night vowing that I would do better the next day. But, it rarely ever happened.

As it turns out both Carter and I solved our problems taking quite similar steps.  We chose to prioritize life activities and then we said “no” to anything that doesn’t fit into those top priorities.

We chose as a top priority to maintain our health and happiness.  And, to do this, we both put at the top of our list starting our day with quiet time. She calls it meditation and I call it prayer – communing with God – first thing in the morning and letting him “establish our day.”  A friend of mine once said to me when I was hurrying from one thing to another:  “God is never in a hurry.  So, you don’t need to be either.” I could immediately see her point. I couldn’t imagine God rushing to get creation going.  He created everything knowing and seeing that it was all good. (Gen 1:31)

I found that quiet prayer first thing in the morning set the tone for the entire day.  It seems to me it is exactly what Jesus did – “And seeing the multitudes, he went up into a mountain: and when he was set, his disciples came unto him.” (Matt. 5:1)

Seeing all the people that needed help, he went up into a mountain, that is, he lifted his thought in prayer before he tackled the day’s problems.

When faced with many things to accomplish and tempted to fall into the “busyness trap,” I have learned to rely on a statement from a book on prayer and spiritual healing: “Whatever it is your duty to do, you can do without harm to yourself.” The Christian healer who wrote that, Mary Baker Eddy, proved in her own life the power of living a God-first life.  I realized I couldn’t suffer for things that needed to be done – and that God wouldn’t give me more to do than I could handle.

I absolutely love this statement!  It frees me from being “too busy.” It reminds me to finish an activity and then calmly go on to another.

After researching and writing this blog, I can’t wait to share what I have found with my manicurist friends.

Don’t think this is only a woman’s problem.  I know men that feel as though their work is never finished.  This is for them too.  But that can be another blog.

#busy-nesstrap  #morning prayer  #toobusy  #overworked  #priortize  #organize

Kate is interested in blogging about the impact of prayer and spirituality on our health from her experience as a Christian Science practitioner. She is the media, legislative and public contact for Christian Science in the state of Maryland. Contact Kate on Twitter: @CscomMaryland, on Facebook: Kate Johnson CS, or email:  maryland@compub.org. 

_____________________________________________________________________________Directions- If it doesn’t stay linked to Whatever it is your duty to do, you can do without harm to yourself.  Highlight and copy the address (below)-Then highlight the above mentioned and relink. Below is the web address to link to body of the blog. Go up to the link icon at the top of the blog box (the second Small box from the right) and select (link) a box will appear for the link address-select the box-hit the right select button and choose paste.  The below address should appear in the box.

http://christianscience.com/read-online/science-and-health/(chapter)/chapter-xii-christian-science-practice#s385_17

 

Do you honestly need more evidence?

Posted by on Feb 8, 2015 in Blog | Comments Off

This thought provoking article presents personal evidence regarding the effectiveness of prayer in healing.  Keith Wommack, a Syndicated Columnist, spiritual thinker, writer and colleague, shares spiritual insight from his thirty-two year prayer based healing practice.  Join me and read what Keith has discovered. 

 Photo by © Glow Images

Photo by © Glow Images

I couldn’t hide it. My grimace gave it away. “Looks like a torn rotator cuff,” my neighbor said to me last Friday.

I’d reached out to pet his dog, but pain had stopped me before I could raise my arm even an inch.

At that moment, although I didn’t have a physician’s diagnosis, I knew it was time to receive treatment. So, I made a call. I phoned a friend, a fellow Christian Science practitioner, and asked for prayerful help.

“You did what?” You might ask, “What about the needed treatment? Where’s the research and scientific data showing the effectiveness of prayer?”

Please click here to read the entire article

 

Kate is interested in blogging about health, health care, spirituality, science, religion, the importance of prayer in maintaining a healthy mind and body.  She is a Christian Science practitioner and the media, legislative and public contact for Christian Science in the state of Maryland. Contact Kate on Twitter: @CscomMaryland, on Facebook: Kate Johnson CS, or email:  maryland@compub.org.

 

Sexual Abuse – Reclaim a pure and blameless identity

Posted by on Feb 2, 2015 in Blog | Comments Off

In this article Wendy Margolese, a colleague, spiritual thinker and blogger, explores the healing effect of forgiveness that can counteract the violence of sexual abuse. Whether you are the victim or the perpetrator there is always hope for redemption and forgiveness.  Join me and discover what spiritual insight Wendy has to share.

Photo by © Glow Images

Photo by © Glow Images

The accusing headlines of sexual abuse leave no one out – celebrity, clergy, government official and student. The accusers range from anonymous to outspoken. Is it possible to not only forgive the perpetrator but also find healing from life-crippling feelings of violation?

Rape and sexual assault are traumatic experiences that interrupt lives at home, at work, and at school, and affect relationships with friends, family, and co- workers. It requires alertness and compassion from those in authority when such situations occur.

But zero tolerance for such heinous acts does not exclude forgiveness and healing. A progressive step is to recognize sexual abuse as not only a crime to be punished, but also as a sin to be overcome by one and forgiven by another.

We have both modern and ancient examples of forgiveness for terrible acts against humanity – from the inspiration of young Malala to the courage of Jesus. Both knew and employed the power of forgiveness in the healing process.

Please click here to read the entire article

 

Kate is interested in blogging about health, health care, spirituality, science, religion, the importance of prayer in maintaining a healthy mind and body.  She is a Christian Science practitioner and the media, legislative and public contact for Christian Science in the state of Maryland. Contact Kate on Twitter: @CscomMaryland, on Facebook: Kate Johnson CS, or email:  maryland@compub.org.

 

“Be yourself; everyone else is already taken.” Oscar Wilde

Posted by on Jan 26, 2015 in Blog | Comments Off

BeYourselfFinding the right “fit” – whether you’re a high school graduate looking for a university or you’re an employer looking for a new employee – is crucial to both our success and our health.

An NFL coach knew this well when he reminded a young recruit who was trying out for the team: “Be yourself; everyone else is already taken”. It helped the young man feel comfortable on the field, enabling the coaches – and him – to really judge whether he would be a good fit. And, the coach indicated, if he wasn’t hired, it didn’t mean he was a failure, it meant there was a better place for him. As it’s turned out, this particular player has made a great contribution to the team for a number of years.

This simple but profound idea – find the right fit – has become a mainstay in many communities –the mental health community, the business community, sports community and other settings where we might be tempted to be what others expect rather than ourselves.  Any time we are persuaded to be someone we are not, we need to step back and reconsider that we can avoid a big, sometimes painful, experience by finding, holding onto, and operating from the basis of who we really are.  For me, this means, finding a better understanding of the nature of God, my relationship to the Divine and what God’s plan for me is.  I’m clear that not being true to myself can lead to serious consequences.

A program entitled “Leading with Authenticity” was launched last year by Z. Colette Edwards, MD, MBA and a colleague.  They were surprised that “authenticity was identified as the most pressing issue among executive leaders during the mini-focus groups we conducted in advance of the program.”

“The topic bubbled up organically in panel discussions and conversation, and was singled out as key to both business success and, on a more personal level, overall health and well-being.”  Edwards brings out that “the stress of being in an environment which does not embrace being genuine or align with one’s values – not surprisingly – leads to a laundry list of health problems associated with stress.”

Authenticity is defined as “acting and expressing oneself in ways consistent with one’s values, desires, and emotions.”

Some of us go through life trying to fit into a mold – to be something we are not – to be more acceptable in a specific society — or, maybe to impress someone, or be like someone we admire.  This means we are either not happy with who we are, have not given ourselves the opportunity to know what our “authentic self” actually is, or maybe feel we would lose something if we revealed our true “values, desires and emotions.”

And, the statement “Be Yourself” is certainly easier said than done.

As a result of circumstances over which I had no control, my life was completely turned upside down.  In desperation and to help with family finances, I was persuaded to take a job for which I knew I wasn’t qualified.  A friend of mine promised he would help me with the work at night.  This “help” never materialized and I was drowning in work I didn’t know how to do.

Depression, discouragement, and fear of failure took a toll on my physical health (headaches, sleeplessness, and digestive problems) and mental well-being – a cloud hung over my head and everything seemed hopeless.

From my Christian upbringing, I knew honesty was crucial to honoring God, myself and others. And this statement from a textbook on Christian healing grabbed my attention when I was reading and praying one day: “Honesty is spiritual power,” and the author continues, “Dishonesty is human weakness, which forfeits divine help.”  Companioning this thought is one from the chapter of Romans in the Bible, “”Provide things honest in the sight of all men.”  I realized what was actually weighing on me wasn’t the overload of, and undoable work, it was the dishonesty! I was not being true to my “authentic self” – to the values I was brought up to embrace and wanted in my life as an adult.

In an article on “Place”, the author of that textbook, Mary Baker Eddy, also points out: “God has given to everyone a place,” and in this harmonious creation there is no void, –nothing left, nothing lacking …  Each fills its own, her own, his own place, whether they have knowledge of it or not.”

I realized I was actually occupying a position that was not meant for me but for someone else. Someone else was looking for that job and had the skills to do what I did not. I left the job soon after this realization and felt relieved. But, I was still in need of employment.

The more I prayed to be true to myself – to understand God and how my life expresses Him –the calmer I became.  And, I experienced relief from each of the physical problems and from the mental cloud.

Shortly after that, my husband bought a business and it became clear to me that my job was to help him. This met our financial needs and we worked together happily for several years until another opportunity came available to me.

So, “be yourself” in this wonderful world.  You will make, and find, it a better, brighter and healthier place.

#authenticity – #stressinbusiness  – #authenticself – #perfectfit – #stress –-#health

Kate is interested in blogging about health, health care, spirituality, science, religion, the importance of prayer in maintaining a healthy mind and body.  She is a Christian Science practitioner and the media, legislative and public contact for Christian Science in the state of Maryland. Contact Kate on Twitter: @CscomMaryland, on Facebook: Kate Johnson CS, or email:  maryland@compub.org. 

Opinion: Help to heal our world: Conquer Fanaticism, by Kay Stroud

Posted by on Jan 19, 2015 in Blog | Comments Off

Photo by © Google Images

Photo by © Google Images

With the current world wide surge of hatred and fanaticism in the news today Kay Stroud, a spiritual thinker, writer, blogger and colleague, presents some possible healing remedies that each of us can consider and practice.  Let’s read what Kay has to share on this pressing issue.

I started thinking about this subject before the terrorism events in Paris, but those events have made dealing with fanatical thinking seem even more imperative.

A fanatic expresses excessive, irrational zeal.

Far from taking an intelligent and well-informed stance on an issue, their passion and manic obsession with a cause or way of doing things colour their decision-making ability negatively.

Fanaticism about a political or religious philosophy that makes us feel superior; holding obsessively to a non-proven hypothesis; belief that there is only one way to play football and there’s a single worthy team; prejudice about what foods we should eat and the best way to cultivate them; or uncompromising belief that we only need to attend to the physical body to be healthy, are all too common habits that lead us down a slippery slope of intolerance.

Please click here to read the entire article

 

Kate is interested in blogging about health, health care, spirituality, science, religion, the importance of prayer in maintaining a healthy mind and body.  She is a Christian Science practitioner and the media, legislative and public contact for Christian Science in the state of Maryland. Contact Kate on Twitter: @CscomMaryland, on Facebook: Kate Johnson CS, or email:  maryland@compub.org.

 

 

The Healing left on Angelina’s cutting room floor, by Tony Lobl

Posted by on Jan 12, 2015 in Blog | 2 comments

... and faith! Photo from googleimages

… and faith!
Photo from googleimages

Unbroken, the hit new movie directed by Angelina Jolie, is a study in strength, perseverance, faith and victory.  Tony Lobl, a spiritual thinker, writer, lecturer and colleague, observes that although the movie is inspirational it leaves out a crucial component to the outcome of this amazing journey.  Let’s join Tony and find out more about the important part that was omitted.

Angelina Jolie has turned Laura Hillenbrand’s best-selling biography Unbroken into an inspirational hit movie. But could it have been even more inspiring?

Angelina Jolie’s third outing as a director has been a stirring success.

As an “inspirational film” Unbroken’s Christmas day launch turned into box office gold, taking in almost $50 million dollars in its first few days, according to Variety. It is expected to be right up there in the top three again during the “post-holiday weekend”.

But her biopic has also courted controversy by omitting overt references to the deep Christian faith at the heart of her protagonist’s life.

Please click here to read the entire article

Kate is interested in blogging about health, health care, spirituality, science, religion, the importance of prayer in maintaining a healthy mind and body.  She is a Christian Science practitioner and the media, legislative and public contact for Christian Science in the state of Maryland. Contact Kate on Twitter: @CscomMaryland, on Facebook: Kate Johnson CS, or email:  maryland@compub.org.

 

Working for or Against your Health?

Posted by on Jan 5, 2015 in Blog | Comments Off

Photo by © Google Images

Photo by © Google Images

Steven Salt, a spiritual thinker, writer, blogger and colleague poses an interesting question. Could habitual, repetitive thinking about what is going to happen in the future and fretting about what has happened in the past directly influence the present?  To find out what Steven has to share about this thought provoking subject, click here to read the entire article.

We can never know about the days to come

But we think about them anyway…

Carly Simon’s hit, “Anticipation” opens with a truism that has proved to be at times comforting; at times, calamitous. And when it comes to the near or distant future, anticipation about our health can be a good or a bad thing. It depends how you think about it.

Let’s face it, we’re mental time travelers. We spend an inordinate amount of time thinking about the future and the past, possibly at the expense of the present. Rehearsing events and conversations that have yet to take place is a favorite pastime (future-amusement) for us mortals.

Why do we do it? Preparing for all the possible scenarios in life, anticipating outcomes within those inner conversations we have with ourselves is a curious habit. For one thing, it is believed to be a protection technique often used to avoid unpleasant surprises.

click here to read the entire article

 

Kate is interested in blogging about health, health care, spirituality, science, religion, the importance of prayer in maintaining a healthy mind and body.  She is a Christian Science practitioner and the media, legislative and public contact for Christian Science in the state of Maryland. Contact Kate on Twitter: @CscomMaryland, on Facebook: Kate Johnson CS, or email:  maryland@compub.org.

Wishing you a Holiday Season Aflame with Gratitude

Posted by on Dec 29, 2014 in Blog | Comments Off

Photo by © Google Images

Photo by © Google Images

This season exudes gratitude and love and it is palpable.  The very act of expressing gratitude dispels the clouds of darkness that gather in our hearts.  Tony Lobl, a spiritual blogger, investigator and colleague, shares an enlightening exercise and his personal experience with the light and power of gratitude.  Join me and find out what insights Tony has discovered.

You gather family and friends of all ages in a large room and ask each person to hold a single, unlit candle.

Then you turn out the lights.

In the darkness, you ask someone to tell you about something they’re grateful for – whether it’s another person, an event or anything else. After sharing their story they light their candle. The next person does the same, and so on, right around the room, story by story.

After each expression of appreciation, the room grows a little brighter. By the time the last person has spoken, it’s ablaze with light!

This idea is not new. One Christmas, a friend of mine heard a young woman reminiscing on a late night radio show about her family and friends doing just this.

Please click here to read the entire article

 

 Kate is interested in blogging about health, health care, spirituality, science, religion, the importance of prayer in maintaining a healthy mind and body.  She is a Christian Science practitioner and the media, legislative and public contact for Christian Science in the state of Maryland. Contact Kate on Twitter: @CscomMaryland, on Facebook: Kate Johnson CS, or email:  maryland@compub.org.

 

Owning our Health: The transforming effect of Christmas

Posted by on Dec 22, 2014 in Blog | Comments Off

The beauty and light of Christmas can lead us to a transformation of thought from a fear based, stressed, unhappy mind set to a more spiritual, peaceful view of life.  This shift of thought brings about a sense of well-being and healing.  Anna Bowness-Park, a colleague, spiritual writer and thinker, shares her inspiring insight with us.  Join me in reading what Anna has to say.

Photo by © Glow Images

Photo by © Glow Images

Christmas lights can transform our homes and communities, but one man’s change of thought brought a transformation in how he saw himself and others

When most of us think about Christmas, we associate it with gift giving, family time and great food. What many hope for at Christmas is a greater sense of peace and well-being for ourselves, our neighbours, as well as for the world. The specific joy of Christmas is when we see all these things come together in specific instances and events that touch and transform our lives.

Author and work/life coach Don Joseph Goewey has experienced this and describes it in a recent article as his “best Christmas ever.” For a long time he had been cynical of Christmas, as well as resentful of the money his wife spent on gifts for their children. He dreaded the Visa card bill in January, and clearly gave everyone a hard time over the holiday season. As he described it, “I wasn’t much fun to have around.”

Please click here to read the entire article

Kate is interested in blogging about health, health care, spirituality, science, religion, the importance of prayer in maintaining a healthy mind and body.  She is a Christian Science practitioner and the media, legislative and public contact for Christian Science in the state of Maryland. Contact Kate on Twitter: @CscomMaryland, on Facebook: Kate Johnson CS, or email:  maryland@compub.org.