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Does being spiritual and religious make you uncool?

Posted by on Dec 15, 2014 in Blog | 0 comments

It seems the general opinion toward identifying yourself as being religious and spiritual has become unpopular and uncool.  Eric Nelson, a spiritual blogger, thinker and colleague, shares his findings with us that perhaps discovering our religious and spiritual identity can be a pretty cool adventure after all.  Join me and read what Eric has discovered.  

Photo by © Glow Images models are used for illustrative purposes

Photo by © Glow Images

PETALUMA, CA, Nov. 18, 2014 – The Ariel Atom is one of the quickest cars on earth, reaching a speed of 100 km/h in just under 2.5 seconds. Even faster is the time between when some people say “I’m spiritual” and “but not religious,” as if within those few milliseconds they might be mistaken for someone misguided, deluded or just plain uncool.

But what about those who consider themselves spiritual and religious? Is the assumption that they have fallen under the spell of some non-existent deity, are perhaps less inclined to think on their own and are obsessed with converting anyone and everyone they meet just to increase their standing with God or the folks back at church?

Possibly. After all, there are plenty of religious types who have been misled, who find it easier to follow blindly than to be guided by their own conscience and whose fear of being left out or left behind fuels a seemingly insatiable drive to reform or, worse, condemn anyone they consider to be unfaithful. No wonder so many are so quick to qualify their spiritual coming out with “but not religious.”

Please click here to read the entire article

Kate is interested in blogging about health, health care, spirituality, science, religion, the importance of prayer in maintaining a healthy mind and body.  She is a Christian Science practitioner and the media, legislative and public contact for Christian Science in the state of Maryland. Contact Kate on Twitter: @CscomMaryland, on Facebook: Kate Johnson CS, or email:  maryland@compub.org.

 

Corrected: Don’t let outgrown theories about age keep you from good health and activity

Posted by on Dec 5, 2014 in Blog | 0 comments

Correction: I am grateful that a reader called my attention that the original blog had an error and it is my pleasure to correct it here. (See paragraph 9)

Former President George H.W. Bush skydiving on his 90th Birthday Google Images

Former President George H.W. Bush skydiving on his 90th Birthday
Google Images

Today, how we view aging is in some ways no different from how some once viewed the earth – flat. The widely held belief over a long time has been that as we age, we must become less active, less mentally acute and less able to live free of illness. Yet, that is beginning to change.

We are beginning to understand that we can, in fact, challenge the widely held belief that everyone must at certain ages begin to slow down, become wrinkled, and lose some senses – sight, hearing, the ability to think clearly or the desire to try new things or take on physical challenges.

Some scientists say every cell in our bodies renews itself every 7 to 10 years – just think of it, a new body every 7 or 10 years.  But there is more to aging or agelessness than acquiring a new body.  Increasingly, we know that how we think about age is more important than how many times the earth has gone around the sun. And, what we believe about the source of our life – is it material or spiritual?  – is, to me, the crucial factor.

“There are many studies demonstrating the profound influence of the mind and beliefs on ageing,” says Deepak Chopra.  “It can speed up, slow down, and even reverse itself.”  And, while this is a popular and relatively new view on aging, it is still a view that leaves someone dependent on the vagaries of human thinking rather than the consistency of an unchanging spiritual principle.

At a conference of spiritual thinkers a few weeks ago I asked the members in attendance to write down a health problem they had overcome through prayer or spiritual thinking – and to share with me what spiritual reasoning they used to overcome the problem.

One fellow, a man who is considered “of mature years”, had been swimming a mile a day several times a week for over 50 years.  He wrote that he has to routinely counter the mental suggestions that he “can’t do this anymore” and he is “too old, weak, tired, cold and bored.”  He continued in his story that he was the only one at his large gym that swims this distance.  He also participates in the most challenging exercise class meant for younger people – Total Conditioning Extreme – and has no difficulties with it.

He wrote that health is a matter of what you expect of yourself.  Are you believing you can’t do something or are you rejoicing that you can?  He has not accepted the “normal” limitations put on an aging body.

Another woman said she had recently taken the same physical fitness test she had taken seven years earlier and that she surpassed all the results from the former test.  She also said she had taken on two new sports – spinning (cycling) and boxing!  She says she loves new challenges and that she never considers her age or the possibility she can’t do something she attempts.

Both of these people shared that they spend time in prayer at the start of each day and even before a specific workout or event. What does that do for them? It reminds them of what Caleb experienced when he was requesting from Joshua (Moses’ right hand man who eventually led the Israelites into the “Promised Land”) that he be granted the rightful inheritance that Moses had promised him.  He indicated that he had wholly followed “the Lord” [was obedient to God’s words] all his life and, at the age of 85, he was as strong as when he was forty. (Joshua 14:11)

Another historical figure, Mary Baker Eddy, who, like Joshua, at 85 accomplished even more than she did at forty, wrote: “Manhood is its eternal noon undimmed by a declining sun.”  These ideas and examples tell us that if we are willing to wholly follow the Lord, we don’t have to buy into a slowing down or diminishing of any function.  We can continue learning and experiencing new things on a daily basis. Many are doing it, and health experts and researchers are beginning to explore how to understand and further it.

Former President, George H.W. Bush is a great contemporary example. In the book, 41: A Portrait of My Father, George W., his son, describes how his father, even at the age of 90, wanted to parachute jump like he had done on his 85th birthday. “He was [and continues to be] daring and courageous, always seeking new adventures and challenges,” George W wrote.  At the time of his recent 90th birthday jump, George H.W., unable to walk long distances, was in a wheelchair. He did complete the jump with his family watching at the landing site.  Nothing would stop him from “living his life to the fullest,” George W said.

In numerous settings, Former President H.W. shared the importance of the sustaining nature of his relationship with God. At a prayer breakfast in Houston, he shared this: “For me, prayer has always been important … it has sustained me at every point of my life: as a boy, when religious reading was part of our home life; as a teenager, when I memorized the Navy Hymn. Or how 48 years ago, aboard the submarine Finback after being shot down in the war, I went up topside one night on the deck, on the conning tower, and stood watch and looked out at the dark. The sky was clear. The stars were brilliant like a blizzard of fireflies in the night. There was a calm inner peace. Halfway around the world in the war zone, there was a calm inner peace: God’s therapy.”

Like Caleb, Eddy, and Former President George H.W., each of us can turn away from human views of aging and draw on God’s therapy to live a long, active, and productive life.

Kate is interested in blogging about health, health care, spirituality, science, religion, the importance of prayer in maintaining a healthy mind and body.  She is a Christian Science practitioner and the media, legislative and public contact for Christian Science in the state of Maryland. Contact Kate on Twitter: @CscomMaryland, on Facebook: Kate Johnson CS, or email:  maryland@compub.org. 

 

 

 

Don’t let outgrown theories about age keep you from good health and activity

Posted by on Dec 1, 2014 in Blog | 1 comment

Former President George H.W. Bush skydiving on his 90th Birthday Google Images

Former President George H.W. Bush skydiving on his 90th Birthday
Google Images

Today, how we view aging is in some ways no different from how some once viewed the earth – flat. The widely held belief over a long time has been that as we age, we must become less active, less mentally acute and less able to live free of illness. Yet, that is beginning to change.

We are beginning to understand that we can, in fact, challenge the widely held belief that everyone must at certain ages begin to slow down, become wrinkled, and lose some senses – sight, hearing, the ability to think clearly or the desire to try new things or take on physical challenges.

Some scientists say every cell in our bodies renews itself every 7 to 10 years – just think of it, a new body every 7 or 10 years.  But there is more to aging or agelessness than acquiring a new body.  Increasingly, we know that how we think about age is more important than how many times the earth has gone around the sun. And, what we believe about the source of our life – is it material or spiritual?  – is, to me, the crucial factor.

“There are many studies demonstrating the profound influence of the mind and beliefs on ageing,” says Deepak Chopra.  “It can speed up, slow down, and even reverse itself.”  And, while this is a popular and relatively new view on aging, it is still a view that leaves someone dependent on the vagaries of human thinking rather than the consistency of an unchanging spiritual principle.

At a conference of spiritual thinkers a few weeks ago I asked the members in attendance to write down a health problem they had overcome through prayer or spiritual thinking – and to share with me what spiritual reasoning they used to overcome the problem.

One fellow, a man who is considered “of mature years”, had been swimming a mile a day several times a week for over 50 years.  He wrote that he has to routinely counter the mental suggestions that he “can’t do this anymore” and he is “too old, weak, tired, cold and bored.”  He continued in his story that he was the only one at his large gym that swims this distance.  He also participates in the most challenging exercise class meant for younger people – Total Conditioning Extreme – and has no difficulties with it.

He wrote that health is a matter of what you expect of yourself.  Are you believing you can’t do something or are you rejoicing that you can?  He has not accepted the “normal” limitations put on an aging body.

Another woman said she had recently taken the same physical fitness test she had taken seven years earlier and that she surpassed all the results from the former test.  She also said she had taken on two new sports – spinning (cycling) and boxing!  She says she loves new challenges and that she never considers her age or the possibility she can’t do something she attempts.

Both of these people shared that they spend time in prayer at the start of each day and even before a specific workout or event. What does that do for them? It reminds them of what Joshua experienced and how they can replicate it:  Joshua was Moses’ right hand man and eventually was the one who led the Israelites into the “Promised Land.”  It is said that Joshua who wholly followed “the Lord” [was obedient to God’s words] all his life and, at the age of 85, was as strong as when he was forty. (Joshua 14:11).

Another historical figure, Mary Baker Eddy, who, like Joshua, at 85 accomplished even more than she did at forty, wrote: “Manhood is its eternal noon undimmed by a declining sun.”  These ideas and examples tell us that if we are willing to wholly follow the Lord, we don’t have to buy into a slowing down or diminishing of any function.  We can continue learning and experiencing new things on a daily basis. Many are doing it, and health experts and researchers are beginning to explore how to understand and further it.

Former President, George H.W. Bush is a great contemporary example. In the book, 41: A Portrait of My Father, George W., his son, describes how his father, even at the age of 90, wanted to parachute jump like he had done on his 85th birthday. “He was [and continues to be] daring and courageous, always seeking new adventures and challenges,” George W wrote.  At the time of his recent 90th birthday jump, George H.W., unable to walk long distances, was in a wheelchair. He did complete the jump with his family watching at the landing site.  Nothing would stop him from “living his life to the fullest,” George W said.

In numerous settings, Former President H.W. shared the importance of the sustaining nature of his relationship with God. At a prayer breakfast in Houston, he shared this: “For me, prayer has always been important … it has sustained me at every point of my life: as a boy, when religious reading was part of our home life; as a teenager, when I memorized the Navy Hymn. Or how 48 years ago, aboard the submarine Finback after being shot down in the war, I went up topside one night on the deck, on the conning tower, and stood watch and looked out at the dark. The sky was clear. The stars were brilliant like a blizzard of fireflies in the night. There was a calm inner peace. Halfway around the world in the war zone, there was a calm inner peace: God’s therapy.”

Like Joshua, Eddy and Former President George H.W., each of us can turn away from human views of aging and draw on God’s therapy to live a long, active, and productive life.

Kate is interested in blogging about health, health care, spirituality, science, religion, the importance of prayer in maintaining a healthy mind and body.  She is a Christian Science practitioner and the media, legislative and public contact for Christian Science in the state of Maryland. Contact Kate on Twitter: @CscomMaryland, on Facebook: Kate Johnson CS, or email:  maryland@compub.org. 

 

 

 

Can Your Grudges Be Making You Sick?

Posted by on Nov 24, 2014 in Blog | Comments Off

To forgive is not only beneficial to your emotional well-being it is also a positive catalyst to better physical health.  Debra Chew, a colleague, spiritual thinker and writer, shares her personal experience on the subject of forgiving. Let’s see what Debra learned.

GOOGLE IMAGES

GOOGLE IMAGES

Forgive and Forget – that’s what “they” say. Often, a lot easier said than done! But, is there something to that old saying? Could it be that by not forgiving and forgetting, the grudge could be making you sick?

It was Mother’s Day – a time for a loving visit with my mother in Ohio – the last thing on my mind was an altercation with a family member! We had experienced a harmonious family day and I was looking forward to the next day’s activities. That’s when my teenaged daughter made a comical comment to someone and it was taken completely out of context. This family member then spoke harshly to my daughter and to me. The words she said stung and hurt deeply. No matter how we reasoned with her, she refused to budge off of her position. She then attempted to draw other family members into the drama, but to no avail. At that point, the atmosphere became so heated, it appeared my daughter and I would have to leave for our home in Tennessee at almost midnight!

As I began packing my suitcase to leave, my compassionate teenager reminded me that God loved us all and that we were here for her grandmother and that leaving would grieve Mom on Mother’s Day far more than this episode had.  She begged me to reconsider.  Wow!  Leave it to a child to remind me that I was choosing to neither feel nor express God’s love.

Please click here to read the entire article

Kate is interested in blogging about health, health care, spirituality, science, religion, the importance of prayer in maintaining a healthy mind and body.  She is a Christian Science practitioner and the media, legislative and public contact for Christian Science in the state of Maryland. Contact Kate on Twitter: @CscomMaryland, on Facebook: Kate Johnson CS, or email:  maryland@compub.org.

 

Boots on a Spiritual Rock, by Steven Salt

Posted by on Nov 17, 2014 in Blog | Comments Off

Steve Salt, a spiritual writer and colleague, shares an astounding story of love, bravery and an absolute faith in the power of prayer to heal.  Join me and read what Steve has learned from this experience.

© GLOW IMAGES models are used for illustrative purposes

© GLOW IMAGES models are used for illustrative purposes

“Nothing can separate you from the love of God,” she gently spoke to him.  With all the confusion surrounding them, she continued to pray with the man she was kneeling over.  It was September 11, 2001.

One of the first female chaplains ever called to active duty, Retired Colonel Janet Horton has had some pretty intense experiences.  In her distinguished career as a Christian Science Military Chaplain, she has seen duty around the globe helping the men and women who serve in the military to keep soul and body together.

Returning to the States after her overseas deployment, Horton was hoping for a post in Georgia. She was assigned to the Pentagon.  At the time she considered it a questionable assignment at best.  “I thought this was a big mistake” she said when I spoke with her, but through prayer she came to the conclusion that God doesn’t slipup.   She eventually came to realize that she was at the right place at the right time.

The morning of September 11, 2001 saw the World Trade Center in New York under attack and United Flight 93 crashing into a Pennsylvania field.   Then at 10:10 am American Flight 77 hit the Pentagon.

Please click here to read the entire article

 

Kate is interested in blogging about health, health care, spirituality, science, religion, the importance of prayer in maintaining a healthy mind and body.  She is a Christian Science practitioner and the media, legislative and public contact for Christian Science in the state of Maryland. Contact Kate on Twitter: @CscomMaryland, on Facebook: Kate Johnson CS, or email:  maryland@compub.org.

 

5 Rock Solid Ways to Master Fear

Posted by on Nov 10, 2014 in Blog | Comments Off

 

© GLOW IMAGES models are used for illustrative purposes

© GLOW IMAGES models are used for illustrative purposes

Ingrid Peschke, a spiritual visionary, writer and colleague, shares her insight on the power of fear to exacerbate problems of every kind and some steps we can take to keep fear in check.  See what Ingrid has discovered and would like to share with you.

Ebola, ISIS, midterm elections, climate change, drought, unemployment. The headlines of the day provide plenty of fodder for fearful reactions.

“We Have Nothing to Fear but Fear Itself” was the topic of Tom Ashbrook’s recent On Point NPR program, echoing FDR’s famous words, “The only thing we have to fear is fear itself.” Given the news of the day, I was intrigued by the topic and listened to the replay online.

Ashbrook interviewed Florence Williams, author of the November cover story for Outside Magazine: “The Secret Science of Fear: How to Thrive When Things Get Scary.” Williams says “fear may be the oldest emotion,” dating as far back as cave dwellers. In response to the news, she says, “Ebola isn’t just contagious — so is fear! And fear is more contagious than Ebola in the U.S. right now.”

Please click here to read the entire article

Kate is interested in blogging about health, health care, spirituality, science, religion, the importance of prayer in maintaining a healthy mind and body.  She is a Christian Science practitioner and the media, legislative and public contact for Christian Science in the state of Maryland. Contact Kate on Twitter: @CscomMaryland, on Facebook: Kate Johnson CS, or email:  maryland@compub.org.

 

 

Increased Trust, Decreased Fear, in the doctor-patient relationship

Posted by on Nov 3, 2014 in Blog | Comments Off

Does mutual understanding between patient and doctor lessen fear and promote better health outcomes?  Eric Nelson, a spiritual thinker, writer and colleague, explores this possibility. Let’s read what Eric has to share.

•© GLOW IMAGES omodels are used for illustrative purposes

• © GLOW IMAGES
o models are used for illustrative purposes

PETALUMA, CA, Oct. 20, 2014 – Does it really matter if your doctor appreciates the power of prayer? For me it may not have been the most important factor to consider but, ultimately, a significant if unexpected plus.

I had spent the better part of three weeks in the hospital, lying in traction, recovering from a number of injuries following a serious accident – two broken legs, various internal injuries and extensive cuts and bruises to my face. At the moment, however, the biggest challenge confronting me was whether or not to go ahead with what one of my doctors considered an immediate need for surgery to mend a shattered pelvis.

After consulting with my parents, I asked if I could be given the rest of the afternoon and that evening to think things through. My doctor agreed and said that he would still plan on coming by in the morning to prep for an operation.

Although on the surface this seemed like a fairly normal exchange between doctor and patient, what was left unsaid between the two of us was just as important as what was.

Please click here to read the entire article

Kate is interested in blogging about health, health care, spirituality, science, religion, the importance of prayer in maintaining a healthy mind and body.  She is a Christian Science practitioner and the media, legislative and public contact for Christian Science in the state of Maryland. Contact Kate on Twitter: @CscomMaryland, on Facebook: Kate Johnson CS, or email:  maryland@compub.org.

 

Simple happiness brings happy, healing thinking

Posted by on Oct 27, 2014 in Blog | Comments Off

Is joy more than a feeling of great pleasure and happiness?  Rodolfo Jerome Lacusong, a  writer on spirituality and health, discusses the possibility that joy and happiness have a direct influence on our health.  Let’s read what Rodolfo has discovered.

Be happy! •© GLOW IMAGES

Be happy!
• © GLOW IMAGES

Have you been hired in a job that the simple requirement is to be joyful?

When I came to the United States and landed a job with an American family, the first question they asked me was, “Can you give joy?”

Well, I got the job, and the joy that is within me was doubled because as I worked with this family, I found out that when we give more, we receive more – not materially but a priceless peace of mind and steady healthy consciousness.

My work was comprised of  a daily cleaning up of the veranda with multiple vegetable plants and flower pots, tidying the bathrooms, rooms and the garage and interestingly, reading a Bible Lesson to a former high school English teacher. At first it was hard to read, but I tried and am really thankful that I accepted the “challenge.”

Please click here to read the entire article

 

Kate is interested in blogging about health, health care, spirituality, science, religion, the importance of prayer in maintaining a healthy mind and body.  She is a Christian Science practitioner and the media, legislative and public contact for Christian Science in the state of Maryland. Contact Kate on Twitter: @CscomMaryland, on Facebook: Kate Johnson CS, or email:  maryland@compub.org.

 

Is it science or God that heals?

Posted by on Oct 20, 2014 in Blog | Comments Off

In this article, Monica Karal, a spiritual thinker, writer and colleague of mine, provides spiritual insight on the debate over – when healing occurs, some give thanks to God and others to science.  Let’s see what Monica has to say about this topic.

Spiritual healing can feel like "a sunrise on a mountaintop." Photo from Google Images

Spiritual healing can feel like “a sunrise on a mountaintop.” Photo from Google Images

When people recover from a serious disease, they sometimes go public. If they’re persons of faith, they often thank God for the healing. This has stirred some pretty lively discussion in the media about the contributions of science and faith. Why do some people credit God for healing?

When people recover from a serious disease, they sometimes go public. If they’re persons of faith, they often thank God for the healing. This has stirred some pretty lively discussion in the media about the contributions of science and faith. Why do some people credit God for healing?

In August, for example, there was a lot of buzz about Kent Brantly. He’s the American doctor who credits God and the compassionate care of medical staff and friends for his recovery from the Ebola virus. He and his family moved to Liberia in 2013 because he felt called to serve the people there.

To read the entire article click here

 

Kate is interested in blogging about health, health care, spirituality, science, religion, the importance of prayer in maintaining a healthy mind and body.  She is a Christian Science practitioner and the media, legislative and public contact for Christian Science in the state of Maryland. Contact Kate on Twitter: @CscomMaryland, on Facebook: Kate Johnson CS, or email:  maryland@compub.org

 

 

 

 

How Love heals grief

Posted by on Oct 13, 2014 in Blog | 2 comments

Sunny Days, construction paper cutouts with acrylics on canvas board, by Steve Buzash, the Son.

Sunny Days, construction paper cutouts with acrylics on canvas board, by Steve Buzash, the Son.

There was a time when I was terrified of death! In fact, I could not even identify my mother’s body when she passed away in a nursing facility many years ago.  So, I sent my husband to do it.

But this all changed when I had to put down one of my favorite cats, Treasure.  I called my daughter to meet me at the vet’s office, thinking that she could be with him while I waited in the waiting room.  But she didn’t arrive in time.  Even though I was afraid, my desire that the cat not be alone when he passed overrode the fear.  I stood there patting him and telling him how much he was loved.  When the vet said “he’s gone”, I realized that Treasure never left me, I still felt his love.  I knew his innocence and wide-eyed approach to every new situation was still with me.  The real essence of who he is – all his wonderful qualities – were not gone and would never leave me.

From then on, I was no longer terrified of death because I knew that death does not terminate the real substance of something that is alive. I felt I could trust this because I think of God as Life and as everything being an expression or outcome of God. Each life that is an expression of God is eternal (like the Divine) – whether I can see it here on the earth or not.

So, when my son “died” in March of this year, I was by his side and unafraid for him.  I knew he still had a lot of living ahead of him – he had dreams to fulfill and lessons to learn.  I was not afraid for him. What I was really fearful of was having to live my life without seeing him.

In the ensuing weeks after his passing, there were many times I thought it impossible to climb out of the darkness called grief.  But I knew I must.  I had read studies and even written two blogs about the impact on a person’s heart that grief can have, and the role that prayer and faith can play in helping someone heal that grief. But, now, I was faced with actually proving what I had written about.

When you think about the oft-used phrase, “broken heart” – a reference to the idea that someone is suffering greatly from grief – it’s easy to understand where it comes from.  My heart appeared to be breaking and so did those of his siblings and close friends.

In an article, “Dealing with grief and bereavement”, from Harvard Health Publications, it says: that “Grief is physical as well as emotional.” And that it can “lead to a decline in health” – particularly to heart problems.  It also mentions several ways to overcome these problems, among which are talk or write about your feelings, talk to friends or seek help from a spiritual advisor. I chose this latter path, with a bit of a twist. I sought help, comfort and healing directly from God.

The Bible and a textbook on Christian healing, Science and Health, by Mary Baker Eddy, provided insights to God as my friend, comforter and advisor. It pointed me to the Bible verse, “like as a mother comforteth her children so will I comfort you”, was especially helpful.  I knew how I had comforted my son – how we all stood by him.  He knew how much he was loved.   I realized that God loved me, my son, and his family and friends even more.  “God is Love,” St. John assures us.   And “God is a God at hand not a God far off.”  The God that is Love is with us at each moment, always. I could feel that.

As I began to feel that love and comfort, I also knew there was more I needed to understand and do. A divine demand from Joshua (24:15) says, “Choose you this day whom ye will serve.”  Was I going to choose sadness, longing and loss or was I going to choose happiness, strength and courage?  It was a choice I knew I needed to make.  I did not want to wallow in sadness and grief. Day by day I chose joy.  It was not always easy.

Eventually, as with the passing of Treasure, I began to realize that the wonderful qualities my son exhibited when he was here with me were still all around me. The ever-present unselfish love he had for everyone was still here.

At one point on my journey, his sister shared an idea that was very helpful to me as well. She said her Christian faith helped her know he was continuing on his journey.  He still has a purpose to fulfill she felt.  She felt she could trust this because the teachings and example Jesus offered tell us that Life is not in the body but in our understanding of God and his son.

Our family vowed to be there for each other and we were – always willing to talk – always willing to get together and comfort each other.  Isn’t this love?  It is; and it felt to us that it was not mere human love but God’s love surrounding us like the sunlight.

I was learning how not to suffer from my son’s death, but still thought it was my responsibility to help family members not suffer as well.  However, there did come a point when I realized it was not. I reasoned we were all part of the universal family of brotherly love with God as the head.  We relied on God and His love – not me – to comfort and sustain us. “Fear thou not; for I am with thee: be not dismayed; for I am thy God:  I will strengthen thee; yea, I will help thee; yea, I will uphold thee with the right hand of my righteousness.” (Isa 41:10)

As the days passed, sometimes friends or acquaintances would stumble over coming up with the right words to say to comfort me.  I would tell them that there was nothing they could say, but what I really needed was a hug.  Not one person stumbled over wrapping their arms around me.  It was good for me and for them.

Kate is interested in blogging about health, health care, spirituality, science, religion, the importance of prayer in maintaining a healthy mind and body.  She is a Christian Science practitioner and the media, legislative and public contact for Christian Science in the state of Maryland. Contact Kate on Twitter: @CscomMaryland, on Facebook: Kate Johnson CS, or email:  maryland@compub.org.

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