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Silence – Inward Stillness, Outward Healing, by Wendy Margolese

Posted by on Apr 22, 2016 in Blog | 0 comments

In 2011 the World Health Organization recognized that noise pollution is detrimental to public health.  Constant audio stimulation has become an accepted and welcomed part of our everyday life.  Noise is constantly being emitted from the media, music, traffic, sirens, etc., etc., etc.  Wendy Margolese, a writer, spiritual explorer and colleague, explores this “modern plague” in her interesting and informative article.  Wendy states and research supports that periods of silence are necessary for our health and well-being. She offers her personal experience and spiritual perspective on how to achieve the rejuvenation that stillness and prayer can bring.  Let’s see what Wendy has discovered and what she has to share on this modern enigma

Silence - inward stillness“Silence is golden” – a phrase coined in the 19th century – may have a deeper meaning today given that “noise pollution” – a more recently coined phrase – is now deemed detrimental to our health.

In fact, a 2011 World Health Organization report called noise pollution the “modern plague”, concluding that “there is overwhelming evidence that exposure to environmental noise has adverse effects on the health of the population.”

We are constantly bombarded by sound – whether it’s traffic noise and emergency sirens or music, television and radio (exacerbated at times by the use of headphones). Many of us long for periods of quiet in our hectic day! And, research indicates that we need periods of silence, because it contributes to many aspects of our overall well-being.

The outcome of a period of golden silence, when taking a break from clamouring distractions, is pleasantly surprising. The Bible tells of the wisdom of the “still small voice” of God and of people being rescued from dire circumstances when they heard it – something hard to do amid the cacophony of today’s noisy world!

Please click here to read the entire article

#health #spirituality #prayer

Kate is interested in sharing blogs about the impact of prayer and spirituality on our health written by her colleagues.  As a Christian Science practitioner and teacher, Kate has experienced the power of prayer in her life as well as in the lives of others.  She is the media and legislative contact for Christian Science in Maryland. Kate can be contacted through Twitter @CScomMaryland and email at: maryland@compub.org

The Wind Beneath Your Wings, by Thomas (Tim) Mitchinson

Posted by on Apr 18, 2016 in Blog | 0 comments

Loneliness is a current and increasing problem in the United States.  It is no respecter of race, economics, age or gender and there is a strong probability that each of us at some point in life will be faced with feeling lonely.  Thomas (Tim) Mitchinson, a writer, spiritual thinker and colleague, gives his spiritual perspective on how to combat the feelings of loneliness with divine Love.  Tim shares his own experience with this challenge and how he was healed by turning to God through prayer.  Take a few minutes and read this heart felt article on the power of divine Love to heal all of our wounds.

Loneliness is healed with Love (1)Feeling lonely can be a challenge to almost everyone at some time or another.  But there is a spiritual answer, beginning with a spiritual point of view, that can help us feel cherished and needed even when alone.

While loneliness is an increasing problem in the US, University of Chicago neuroscientist and researcher, John Cacioppo, found that good friendships can reverse these feelings.  He stated, “Our work suggests that what’s important is having friends in whom you can trust.  Someone you can count on.”

This begs us to consider, first of all, how we can be a good friend to others.  We are all capable of helping others feel less lonely.  Expressing our spirituality – our affection, humility, forgiveness, and appreciation of others are wonderful ways to combat loneliness for ourselves as well as others.

Throughout life, everyone hopes they will have the support and encouragement of friends and family, especially during trying times.  We all yearn for a “wind beneath our wings” to paraphrase a Bette Midler classic.  I remember a time in my life when I lost my two best friends, and simultaneously was beginning a new job.  Instead of feeling alienated, though, I looked for opportunities to use my talents to benefit others and ended up joining a community band and playing clarinet.

Please click here to read the entire article

 

#mentalhealth #spirituality #prayer

Kate is interested in sharing blogs about the impact of prayer and spirituality on our health written by her colleagues.  As a Christian Science practitioner and teacher, Kate has experienced the power of prayer in her life as well as in the lives of others.  She is the media and legislative contact for Christian Science in Maryland. Kate can be contacted through Twitter @CScomMaryland and email at: maryland@compub.org

The War on Truth and Reality, by Don Ingwerson

Posted by on Apr 11, 2016 in Blog | Comments Off on The War on Truth and Reality, by Don Ingwerson

The question, “What is truth?” has been an enigma since Jesus’ time and is still an ongoing academic topic of discussion.  Don Ingwerson, a spiritual writer and colleague, explores the process of shifting our view on how to ascertain what we consider to be true.  Don asks us to consider truth and reality to be more than what we can see with our eyes, hear with our ears, or can touch with our hands.  Current scientific theories suggest that reality and truth are more metaphysical then physical.  Read this stimulating article and determine for yourself the answer to “What is truth?”

Break the chain of cherished opinions! (1)I’ve found that striving to understand and live in the light of this view of spiritual reality brings consciousness into a healthier sphere.

“What is truth?” asked Pilate during the trial of Jesus before his tragically unjust crucifixion.

Jesus was subsequently put to death – not because Pilate found fault with Jesus’ answer, but because the public were stirred into rejecting what Jesus understood to be true.

Today, global warming, health care, and evolution are just a few of the topics that stir impassioned arguments about what is or isn’t true. As the presidential debates heat up and different candidates share their vision for the future, they try to convince members of the public to share their perception of truth, often illustrating the huge gaps that exist between individuals and groups in what they hold to be true and in what data they use to justify their position.

Please click here to read the entire article

#health #spirituality #prayer

Kate is interested in sharing blogs about the impact of prayer and spirituality on our health written by her colleagues.  As a Christian Science practitioner and teacher, Kate has experienced the power of prayer in her life as well as in the lives of others.  She is the media and legislative contact for Christian Science in Maryland. Kate can be contacted through Twitter @CScomMaryland and email at: maryland@compub.org

Mental Healing: Brain or Mind? by Mojisola Solanke

Posted by on Apr 4, 2016 in Blog | Comments Off on Mental Healing: Brain or Mind? by Mojisola Solanke

It seems there has always been a social stigma associated with mental illness and anyone deemed as mentally ill in this country and many others. Mojisola Solanke, a Christian Science Media Representative for Nigeria, writer and colleague, offers a possible solution for mental illness that reaches beyond orthodox treatment.  She explores the possibility that there may be an alternative treatment that does not necessitate using prescription drugs.  Many in her country are seeking a different kind of help called ‘spiritual help’.  Mojisola shares her spiritual perspective on how ‘spiritual help’ -discovering our deep connection to God- can treat and heal mental illness. Read this thought provoking article on this sensitive and current topic.

mental healing- brain or MindLike any ailment, mental illness is distressing. Unlike physical illnesses however, mental illness has the added problem of the stigma society attaches to it. The perception of diminished mental capacity may inadvertently bring a sense of fear, resulting in negative reactions, without the compassion and understanding the public would normally show one suffering ill health. This attitude may also be due to the fact that the law rightly makes allowance when meting out punishment for crimes committed by those deemed to exhibit reduced mental capacity. There are various forms of mental illness, ranging from the mild to the extremely aggressive, the emotional and psychological to the psychiatric.

Specialists who treat mental illness, in many cases seek its cause in an abnormality of the brain, either due to injury, trauma or natural causes; and they treat the ailment with material drugs, in addition to counseling and other therapies. In many countries, such as Nigeria, some also seek what is termed ‘spiritual help’. Indeed some medical personnel, finding a case beyond the ken of orthodox treatment, have quietly suggested that patients resort to spiritual means – the aim of any course of treatment being healing.

Is the cause of mental illness in some way inextricably dependent on a physical organ, specifically derangement of the brain? And do material methods and modes of treatment afford the only hope for a cure? The very name of the ailment would suggest otherwise. Doctors who specialise in the brain insist that certain brain lobes carry out the function of thinking, mood, personality and whatnot. Mary Baker Eddy takes a diametrically opposite view. She insists, in her book on healing titled Science and Health with key to the Scriptures, that the brain and its lobes, being made up entirely of matter, cannot of themselves, think, or be the repository of intelligence. This answer, though radical, if given due consideration, may give a hint as to what may actually benefit the diagnosis, treatment and healing of mental illness.

Please click here to read the entire article

#mentalhealth #spirituality #prayer

Kate is interested in sharing blogs about the impact of prayer and spirituality on our health written by her colleagues.  As a Christian Science practitioner and teacher, Kate has experienced the power of prayer in her life as well as in the lives of others.  She is the media and legislative contact for Christian Science in Maryland. Kate can be contacted through Twitter @CScomMaryland and email at: maryland@compub.org

Removing the mask of mental – and physical – disease, by Eric Nelson

Posted by on Mar 28, 2016 in Blog | Comments Off on Removing the mask of mental – and physical – disease, by Eric Nelson

In this article, Eric Nelson, a Christian Science Practitioner, writer and colleague, explores a new treatment for the invisible wounds of war known as post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD).  Art therapist Melissa Walker has had great success in unmasking and healing the scars of war through art and creativity.  Eric offers a spiritual approach one which has also been proven to provide permanent healing.  He proposes that turning to God, as an available and present help in any fearful experience or fearful dream-either while asleep or awake, heals as successfully today- as it did 2000 years ago.  Take a moment and read what Eric has to share on this provocative topic.

Remove the maskArt therapist Melissa Walker achieves ‘spectacular results’ by helping military vets uncover their hidden wounds in creative, non-threatening ways.

“Give a man a mask,” said Oscar Wilde, “and he will tell you the truth.”

A clever adage, to be sure. But for creative arts therapist Melissa Walker, it’s actually the process of unmasking the invisible wounds of her patients that enables them to discover what’s true – and what’s not – and to experience lasting healing.

“Imagine you are a high ranking military service member deployed to Afghanistan,” said Walker during her talk at last year’s TEDMED conference in Palm Springs. “Incoming mortar rounds are exploding all around you. Struggling to see through the dust and the smoke, you do your best to help those wounded and crawl to a nearby bunker.

“As you regain your vision, you see a bloody face staring back at you. The image is terrifying, but you quickly come to understand it’s not real. This vision continues to visit you multiple times a day and in your sleep. You choose not to tell anyone for fear of losing your job or being seen as weak. You give the vision a name, ‘Bloody Face in Bunker,’ and call it BFIB for short. You keep BFIB locked away in your mind, secretly haunting you for the next seven years.

Please click here to read the entire article

#mentalhealth #spirituality #prayer

Kate is interested in sharing blogs about the impact of prayer and spirituality on our health written by her colleagues.  As a Christian Science practitioner and teacher, Kate has experienced the power of prayer in her life as well as in the lives of others.  She is the media and legislative contact for Christian Science in Maryland. Kate can be contacted through Twitter @CScomMaryland and email at: maryland@compub.org

The Missing Piece Behind Healing Addiction, by Malissa Lakin-Watson

Posted by on Mar 21, 2016 in Blog | Comments Off on The Missing Piece Behind Healing Addiction, by Malissa Lakin-Watson

Today, much debate is going on about the cause of addiction-is it a moral weakness or is it considered a disease?  Malissa Lakin-Watson, a writer, spiritual thinker and colleague, explores this question in her touching and inspiring article.  She talks about her personal journey with addiction and how she was healed by realizing the power to do so was already inside her.  Through her spiritual journey Malissa discovered that she and everyone else, has a deep connection to God-who is all good and this connection changed her life. Read how she was able to overcome this difficult challenge with Divine Love.
The missing piece behind healing addiction...No matter who we are or where we come from, I believe we all want the same things—to feel we belong and are loved by those closest to us must surely be at the top of the list.

But when life doesn’t go as planned or the relationships we have don’t bring the comfort we’re looking for, turning to drugs or alcohol to fill the void may feel like a viable solution.~

In this TED talk, British author and journalist, Johann Hari, explains that new research has been shedding light on the fact that everything we think we know about addiction may not be entirely true—that addiction is either a moral weakness or it is a disease. In his desire to help those he loved who had become drug addicts, he was impelled to go on a quest, looking for a better way to address this problem.

After extensive and exhaustive research spanning the globe, he came to this conclusion, “the opposite of addiction isn’t sobriety but connection.”

And just what is this connection he is talking about? He explains that we, as human beings, need to bond with other human beings. Nothing new there, but when some seem unable to maintain close relationships, or “can’t bear to be present in their lives” because of trauma or some other adverse circumstance, “(they) will bond with something that gives relief,” he says. That “something” can be substances which, when indulged in heavily and often, can lead to addictive behavior.

Please click here to read the entire article

#health #spirituality #prayer

Kate is interested in sharing blogs about the impact of prayer and spirituality on our health written by her colleagues.  As a Christian Science practitioner and teacher, Kate has experienced the power of prayer in her life as well as in the lives of others.  She is the media and legislative contact for Christian Science in Maryland. Kate can be contacted through Twitter @CScomMaryland and email at: maryland@compub.org

Owning our Health: From Virtual Reality to Seeing Beyond our Limited Views of Life, by Anna Bowness-Park

Posted by on Mar 14, 2016 in Blog | Comments Off on Owning our Health: From Virtual Reality to Seeing Beyond our Limited Views of Life, by Anna Bowness-Park

Many believe that how we see the world is often a misinterpretation of reality.  That being able to look beyond what is generally accepted as barriers and limitations may actually be opportunities for progress.  Anna Bowness-Park, a syndicated writer, Christian Science Practitioner and colleague, gives us inspiring examples in this article of people who, by thinking out of one-dimensional points of view, have achieved great things for themselves and for the world.  She shares her unique perspective on understanding consciousness in a more spiritual way and on establishing a closer relationship with God.  Anna proposes that perhaps we could all use a shift in how we perceive life!

Reality as it isA popular viral video is making its way around social media. A humpback whale leaps dramatically up through a gym floor, where scores of children stand watching and gasping enthusiastically as it makes a huge splash when it comes back down and hits the floor, which becomes the ocean. Real? Of course not!

Magic Leap, a new company that is making its own waves within the virtual reality industry, created this dramatic image. Commenting on the video, the tech division of media site Newsie explains that the technology is a “dynamic digitalized light field signal” which merges lifelike, computer generated images – like the whale – with what the user sees in the real world. It’s called “Augmented Reality”. It involves a wearable projector that tracks the users eyes – like Google glass, but actually works like it’s supposed to.

Entertaining, fascinating, and an escape from our boring everyday lives, virtual reality is the next enthralling invention to engage us. Moving on from the magic shows of yesterday’s traditional illusionists, we now have the opportunity to experience the hologram deck from Star Trek – Next Generation in our living rooms. Anyone who saw the video of a 90-year old woman having her first experience with the Oculus Rift technology understands the thrill. “If I try to explain this to anybody, they won’t believe me,” she gasped, adding, “I don’t believe I am seeing this.”

But what these modern illusionists show us is that seeing should not necessarily be believing.

Please click here to read the entire article

#reality #spirituality #prayer

Kate is interested in sharing blogs about the impact of prayer and spirituality on our health written by her colleagues.  As a Christian Science practitioner and teacher, Kate has experienced the power of prayer in her life as well as in the lives of others.  She is the media and legislative contact for Christian Science in Maryland. Kate can be contacted through Twitter @CScomMaryland and email at: maryland@compub.org

Owning our Health: Mary Baker Eddy – A Woman Who Refused to be a Victim, by Anna Bowness-Park

Posted by on Mar 7, 2016 in Blog | Comments Off on Owning our Health: Mary Baker Eddy – A Woman Who Refused to be a Victim, by Anna Bowness-Park

March has been designated as Women’s History month and as such, Anna Bowness-Park, a writer, Christian Science Practitioner and colleague, explores the life of one of America’s most historic women-Mary Baker Eddy.  She shares an in depth accounting of the life and accomplishments of this 19th century woman.  A life that included overcoming much adversity and sickness. Anna explains how Mary Baker Eddy was led to discover Christian Science, author her seminal work-Science and Health, establish a worldwide religion and at the ripe age of 86 undertake the publishing of an international daily newspaper.  Join me and find out more about this inspirational woman of history.

Mary Baker Eddy,  Founder of Christian Science and author of Science and Health with Key to the Scriptures

Mary Baker Eddy, Founder of Christian Science and author of Science and Health with Key to the Scriptures

Mary Baker Eddy had every right to believe she was a victim of life’s circumstances. But she didn’t.

A frail child, Eddy’s formal education came to an end at the age of twelve, which was a fairly accepted practice for girls in the 19th century. But she wanted to learn, and persisted with her education at home, helped by her brother.

However, from childhood, one of the most valuable things she learned was from her mother – to lean always on God’s love.

As a young woman she married and was almost immediately widowed while expecting her first child. Unable to support herself, she had to move back in with her parents on their farm in New Hampshire.

Please click here to read the entire article

#history #spirituality #prayer

Kate is interested in sharing blogs about the impact of prayer and spirituality on our health written by her colleagues.  As a Christian Science practitioner and teacher, Kate has experienced the power of prayer in her life as well as in the lives of others.  She is the media and legislative contact for Christian Science in Maryland. Kate can be contacted through Twitter @CScomMaryland and email at: maryland@compub.org

Mind over Milkshake – A Step Towards A More Spiritual Diet, by Annu Matthai

Posted by on Feb 29, 2016 in Blog | Comments Off on Mind over Milkshake – A Step Towards A More Spiritual Diet, by Annu Matthai

Many people all over the world made losing weight this year’s number one New Year’s resolution.  Annu Matthai, a spiritual writer, Christian Science Practitioner and colleague, shares the findings of a new study about a different approach to accomplishing weight loss in this interesting and informative article.  She proposes, along with others, that the mindset we are in can fool our bodies and our appetites. Anna offers her unique perspective on ways to prevent constant worry about food and dieting from controlling our thinking. Maybe a shift in thought to a more spiritual mindset about substance and body is worth considering? See what Annu has discovered.

Mind over Milkshake –If your New Year’s resolution is that perennial favorite – weight loss – you may want to read further.

As someone interested in the connection between our thinking and our health, I was intrigued by the title of an online interview – Mind over Milkshake  – describing a study conducted by Dr. Alia Crum and her colleagues of Yale University to determine if food labels affect metabolism.

Half the participants in the study were given milkshakes labeled Sensishake , zero fat, no sugar and 140 calories.  The milkshakes for the remaining group were labeled Indulgence, with sugar and fat adding up to 620 calories.  In actual fact, both milkshakes were exactly the same – 300 calories each.

Measuring the ghrelin (hunger hormone) levels of participants before and after consuming the milkshakes showed rather surprising results. Participants who believed they had consumed the “indulgent” shake felt more full and satisfied than their counterparts who thought they had consumed the “sensible” milkshake.  The study showed that beliefs about food have a more significant impact on lowering appetite and increasing metabolism than actual calories.

Please click here to read the entire article

#health #spirituality #prayer

Kate is interested in sharing blogs about the impact of prayer and spirituality on our health written by her colleagues.  As a Christian Science practitioner and teacher, Kate has experienced the power of prayer in her life as well as in the lives of others.  She is the media and legislative contact for Christian Science in Maryland. Kate can be contacted through Twitter @CScomMaryland and email at: maryland@compub.org

Did you hear the one about the Baptist, the Muslim, and the Christian Scientist?, by Tim Mitchinson

Posted by on Feb 22, 2016 in Blog | Comments Off on Did you hear the one about the Baptist, the Muslim, and the Christian Scientist?, by Tim Mitchinson

In this article, Thomas (Tim) Mitchinson, a syndicated writer, spiritual thinker and colleague, offers his perspective on true ecumenical unity and what that could do to promote harmony and respect for all faiths and beliefs.  He suggests that we need a more expansive view of God’s love – one that would include all of mankind.  Tim shares his spiritual viewpoint on the importance of being tolerant of our differences and to rejoice in our similarities.  See what you think!

I haven’t heard it, but if there were such a joke, it would probably be based on a stereotype of one kind or another. Stereotyping another’s religion can be a hurtful thing, in some cases even malicious in its intent. It can breed fear and violence. But it can also be a red flag that something needs to change, and a time for recognizing that we can do better than this. We can do a better job of understanding one another.

Take my daughter’s first grade classroom, for example. Her main teacher was a Hindu Ph.D. candidate from India. Her aides in the classroom were three women: one Asian (religion unknown), one Christian, and one Muslim. The students in the class came from many different religions, cultures, and backgrounds.

I loved that classroom. There was no room in it for any narrow-minded thinking or religious prejudices. From clothing to holidays to customs, everyone had to be open to understanding each other and why they did the things they did. Recognizing the differences – and similarities – and empathizing with each other brought harmony to that classroom, and the same attitudes can help bring peace to our communities.

 

Please click here to read the entire article

#wellbeing #spirituality #prayer

Kate is interested in sharing blogs about the impact of prayer and spirituality on our health written by her colleagues.  As a Christian Science practitioner and teacher, Kate has experienced the power of prayer in her life as well as in the lives of others.  She is the media and legislative contact for Christian Science in Maryland. Kate can be contacted through Twitter @CScomMaryland and email at: maryland@compub.org