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Thankful in a Tumultuous Year, by Steven Salt

Posted by on Nov 29, 2016 in Blog | 0 comments

Steven Salt, a colleague and a writer who covers the nexus of science, spirituality and health, gives us much food for thought in this proclamation of gratitude. Steven shares his spiritual understanding and heart filled messages from heroes who lived in other tumultuous periods of history.  In this article, he offers a healing (spiritual) remedy for our present unrest.  I hope you will join me and read this Thanksgiving address that is relevant for all times!

presidents-that-unite-final-1Could things be anymore divided?

Protest, distrust, hatred, and violence scarred the year, but the President thoughtfully shared his impression: “The year that is drawing towards its close, has been filled with the blessings of fruitful fields and healthful skies.”

Abraham Lincoln’s gracious assessment of 1863 is immortalized in the opening line of his first Thanksgiving Day Proclamation. And it offers insight into a healing response to this year’s unrest.

Over 150 years have passed since Lincoln’s establishment of an annual, national observance of “Thanksgiving and Praise to our beneficent Father who dwelleth in the Heavens.”  In 1863 that day came just one week after the dedication of the Soldiers’ National Cemetery at Gettysburg where Lincoln gave his celebrated two minute address. The War Between the States would go on for another year and a half.

What prompted Lincoln to articulate such a “healthful” outlook, where many saw only servitude to gloom and despair, was an intensified appreciation for blessings and their origin.  He saw “bounties, which are so constantly enjoyed that we are prone to forget the source from which they come.”  He writes in his Thanksgiving Proclamation that these abundances are “so extraordinary a nature, that they cannot fail to penetrate and soften even the heart which is habitually insensible to the ever watchful providence of Almighty God.”

Please click here to read the entire article

#mentalhealth #spirituality #prayer

Kate is interested in sharing blogs about the impact of prayer and spirituality on our health written by her colleagues.  As a Christian Science practitioner and teacher, Kate has experienced the power of prayer in her life as well as in the lives of others.  She is the media and legislative contact for Christian Science in Maryland. Kate can be contacted through Twitter @CScomMaryland and email at: maryland@compub.org

Thankful in a tumultuous year, by Steven Salt

Posted by on Nov 28, 2016 in Blog | 0 comments

presidents-that-unite-final-1Steven Salt, a colleague and a writer who covers the nexus of science, spirituality and health, gives us much food for thought in this proclamation of gratitude. Steven shares his spiritual understanding and heart filled messages from heroes who lived in other tumultuous periods of history.  In this article, he offers a healing (spiritual) remedy for our present unrest.  I hope you will join me and read this Thanksgiving address that is relevant for all times!

Could things be anymore divided?

Protest, distrust, hatred, and violence scarred the year, but the President thoughtfully shared his impression: “The year that is drawing towards its close, has been filled with the blessings of fruitful fields and healthful skies.”

Abraham Lincoln’s gracious assessment of 1863 is immortalized in the opening line of his first Thanksgiving Day Proclamation. And it offers insight into a healing response to this year’s unrest.

Over 150 years have passed since Lincoln’s establishment of an annual, national observance of “Thanksgiving and Praise to our beneficent Father who dwelleth in the Heavens.”  In 1863 that where Lincoln gave his celebrated two minute address. The War Between the Sttes would go on for another year and a half.

What prompted Lincoln to articulate such a “healthful” outlook, where many saw only servitude to gloom and despair, was an intensified appreciation for blessings and their origin.  He saw “bounties, which are so constantly enjoyed that we are prone to forget the source from which they come.”  He writes in his Thanksgiving Proclamation that these abundances are “so extraordinary a nature, that they cannot fail to penetrate and soften even the heart which is habitually insensible to the ever watchful providence of Almighty God.”

Please click here to read the entire article

#mentalhealth #spirituality #prayer

Kate is interested in sharing blogs about the impact of prayer and spirituality on our health written by her colleagues.  As a Christian Science practitioner and teacher, Kate has experienced the power of prayer in her life as well as in the lives of others.  She is the media and legislative contact for Christian Science in Maryland. Kate can be contacted through Twitter @CScomMaryland and email at: maryland@compub.org

A Fresh Perspective on Problem Solving, by Van Driessen

Posted by on Nov 21, 2016 in Blog | 0 comments

In today’s society, we are faced with many challenges.  Daily a barrage of problems are systematically brought to our attention via the internet, social media, television and the radio.  Sometimes this type of constant exposure exacerbates the personal problems we may be facing.  In this article, Van Driessen, a colleague and a writer who focuses on spirituality and health from his perspective as a Christian Science Practitioner, offers his personal experience and unique insight on a more viable (always present, spiritual) solution to every challenge or problem that may cross our path.  Take a moment and read this enlightening article and see what Van has to share.

perspectiveAre you feeling stuck with a chronic health issue or discouraged with long-term unemployment or worried by a troubled relationship with no clear solution?

If you’ve found various approaches to solving these chronic challenges just haven’t produced results, the research and ideas shared in Spiritual Child: The New Science on Parenting for Health and Lifelong Thriving, by Dr. Lisa Miller, might just offer some insights on a key element to finding solutions to knotty problems. That element is our awareness of a benevolent higher power and an understanding of our connection to that power. Dr. Miller, Founder of the Spirituality Mind Body Institute at the Teachers’ College, Columbia University, notes that her department’s research over the last 10 years indicates this is the greatest resource we have.

Although spirituality as a foundation for solving problems and living a good life was understood for millennia, in our modern age it has been and often is ignored. We’re constantly told that solutions can only be found through secular human inventions or actions – chemical  and mechanical systems for solving illness and human footsteps for taking care of things such as employment and relationships. Attention to things of the Spirit, while perhaps making a recent resurgence, have been systematically eliminated from daily life.

But if we’re not getting results with the recommended solutions and tapping into this divine resource is something we want to explore, where can we begin?

Please click here to read the entire article

#wellbeing #spirituality #prayer

Kate is interested in sharing blogs about the impact of prayer and spirituality on our health written by her colleagues.  As a Christian Science practitioner and teacher, Kate has experienced the power of prayer in her life as well as in the lives of others.  She is the media and legislative contact for Christian Science in Maryland. Kate can be contacted through Twitter @CScomMaryland and email at: maryland@compub.org

Happiness at work: It’s an inside, personal job, by Sharon Andrews

Posted by on Nov 14, 2016 in Blog | Comments Off on Happiness at work: It’s an inside, personal job, by Sharon Andrews

Sharon Andrews, a colleague and the media and legislative liaison for Christian Science for Indiana, shares her spiritual perspective on how to achieve and maintain a happy and productive work experience.  Recent studies have revealed that stress, boredom and apathy at work can produce chronic health problems manifesting in both physical and mental illness in employees. Sharon offers three steps that she acknowledges can shift anyone’s mindset out of the ‘doldrums’ to a happier and healthier point of view.  Join me and learn what Sharon has discovered in this joy filled and thoughtful article.

happiness-at-work-photoYou stare at the computer screen.

You quietly check your Facebook news feed.

You daydream about that next vacation.

Most of us have known that I’d-rather-be-anywhere-but-work feeling.

Even though employee wellness and happiness are a greater focus than ever for many companies, a recent Gallup Poll finds that more than 20 percent of employees in North America and Europe are actively disengaged from their jobs.

This apathy, reports Gallup, is also costing the U.S. economy $550 billion a year.

“What if the greatest threat to capitalism,” asked William Davies in a recent Atlantic article, “is simply lack of enthusiasm and activity?”

And, he warns that boredom at work shows up as chronic health problems.

So, what do all these apathetic workers need?

More vacations? Bigger offices?

Most studies indicate that such perks are a temporary boost to on-the-job engagement. They don’t permanently relieve the boredom, stress and depression which some studies indicate can lead to a variety of health issues.

What could permanently conquer employment doldrums?

Please click here to read the entire article

#mentalhealth #spirituality #prayer

Kate is interested in sharing blogs about the impact of prayer and spirituality on our health written by her colleagues.  As a Christian Science practitioner and teacher, Kate has experienced the power of prayer in her life as well as in the lives of others.  She is the media and legislative contact for Christian Science in Maryland. Kate can be contacted through Twitter @CScomMaryland and email at: maryland@compub.org

“Take it to the next level!”, by Thomas (Tim) Mitchinson

Posted by on Nov 7, 2016 in Blog | Comments Off on “Take it to the next level!”, by Thomas (Tim) Mitchinson


In this article, Thomas (Tim) Mitchinson, a colleague and a columnist who writes on the relationship between thought, spirituality and health, shares, his unique point of view on how elevating our thinking can produce favorable results in both our mental and physical health. Tim acknowledges along with a Health Examiner, researchers and the subsequent findings, that taking emotions to the ‘higher level’ (a spiritual, moral level) not only makes us happy, it has been found to improve our health and mental well-being. If each of us expressed more compassion and love toward one another- perhaps this paradigm shift could uplift the world to a ‘higher level’. See what you think!

go-to-the-next-level-1We are in the middle of football season and the major league baseball post season.  We have seen athletes exceed beyond “personal bests”; reminding me of Nike’s campaign: “Take it to the next level”!  To me, it’s all about breaking through our own limitations and doing or being the best we can.

This doesn’t just apply to college or professional athletes.  The readers of this paper have found in their own lives ways to “take it to the next level.”  Maybe they are walking further each morning than they did the previous day, swimming farther, or lifting heavier weights.

But I think there are many ways to take life to the next level.  How about embracing a new level in the good emotions we cultivate and express in our lives?  Maybe we can express more affection, compassion and gratitude than we have in the past.  Why should we do that? Well, one reason is simply that it makes us feel good. Additionally, it’s quite possible that doing those things can have a significant impact on our health.

Kory Floyd, an associate professor at Arizona State University’s Hugh Downs School of Human Communication has studied the effect of affection on one’s health.  “Being affectionate is good for you,” Floyd says. “Affection can be a simple, non-pharmaceutical, cheap way to reduce stress.” Floyd has found that there are direct associations between being an affectionate person and a lower risk of depression and stress.  “Highly affectionate people tend to have better mental health and less stress. They also react to stress better,” he stated.

Please click here to read the entire article

#wellbeing #spirituality #prayer

Kate is interested in sharing blogs about the impact of prayer and spirituality on our health written by her colleagues.  As a Christian Science practitioner and teacher, Kate has experienced the power of prayer in her life as well as in the lives of others.  She is the media and legislative contact for Christian Science in Maryland. Kate can be contacted through Twitter @CScomMaryland and email at: maryland@compub.org

Headline-Induced Anxiety? Don’t Despair! by Deborah Sherwood

Posted by on Oct 31, 2016 in Blog | Comments Off on Headline-Induced Anxiety? Don’t Despair! by Deborah Sherwood

With the influx of negative news reporting via the media, the internet, television, radio and social media- news ‘induced anxiety’ is at an all-time high.  In this article, Deborah Sherwood, a colleague and a writer on health, spiritual healing and prayer, offers a remedy to the constant exposure of negative news that can adversely effect on our physical health and emotional wellbeing. She shares her unique spiritual perspective along with statements from reputable news organizations on how to avoid the negativity that ‘anxiety induced’ headlines and stories produce.  Deborah suggests a spiritual-prayerful- approach to annulling the emotionally charged effects associated with exaggerated and fabricated news reporting. This article is a must read!

headline-induced-anxietyThe world is falling apart, if you believe everything in the media. Few of us are immune to “headline-induced anxiety.” Research and statistics show that while the world has for some decades actually become increasingly safe, healthy and humane, society perceives the opposite.

As a long-time public relations consultant, my profession required me to consume news and work closely with media. Although I was privileged to represent upstanding clients with positive stories to tell, the surrounding negative stories often forced me to make a choice: allow troubling news to spiral me into concern, or find a more healthy and constructive way to process it.

Reputable news organizations alert people to the quicksand engulfing sensational headlines and images — filling people’s minds with misinformation and myths. They warn that this can provoke a wide spectrum of mental angst, including pessimism, cynicism, helplessness and hopelessness, which can lead to anxiety, depression, fatalism, and aggression.

Responding to this need, some journalists have published content that raises awareness and provides tips to help people minimize the onset of headline-induced anxiety. These include being more well-informed about the actual facts; adopting more careful viewing habits; realizing that the media highlights extremes, while reality is a more balanced middle ground; avoiding news that triggers your own sensitivities; finding news sources that provide more positive news; shaping the media with your clicks; or even refraining from consuming news altogether.

Please click here to read the entire article

#mentalhealth #spirituality #prayer

Kate is interested in sharing blogs about the impact of prayer and spirituality on our health written by her colleagues.  As a Christian Science practitioner and teacher, Kate has experienced the power of prayer in her life as well as in the lives of others.  She is the media and legislative contact for Christian Science in Maryland. Kate can be contacted through Twitter @CScomMaryland and email at: maryland@compub.org

Get over your prejudices for better health, at home and abroad, by Kay Stroud

Posted by on Oct 24, 2016 in Blog | Comments Off on Get over your prejudices for better health, at home and abroad, by Kay Stroud

In today’s clime, the mention of traveling and especially traveling to foreign countries invokes fear, prejudice and concern about personal safety.  Kay Stroud, a colleague and a writer who writes about the connection between consciousness, spirituality and health, shares her personal experience and spiritual perspective on an eye opening approach to debunk these misconceptions and fears.  Unchecked these fears and prejudices can limit our thinking and have been proven to adversely affect our health and wellbeing.  Join me and read this heart felt article about the Love that casts out fear and can free us of prejudice.

get-over-your-prejudices-for-better-health-at-home-and-abroadYou have exciting travel plans. You announce your plans to friends and family.

What’s the reaction?

Is your excitement reflected back to you? Or do you find yourself swamped by a barrage of fears and prejudices? Worse still, are you adversely influenced by this negativity?

We certainly can be, unless we take the opportunity to uncover what it is that’s at the root of those misconceptions.

When my husband and I were asked to accompany my brother-in-law and his Indonesian wife to stay with her Muslim family in east Java for a short holiday recently, it seemed like a great opportunity to experience another culture. However, there were reservations voiced from several directions, which included fears arising from racism and religious bigotry, as well as health concerns raised in relation to the environment.

Rather than slipping into seeing peoples and cultures as sinister or environments as unhealthy, it’s beneficial to recognise that we can resist the temptation to take on such fears and prejudices. We can rein in these thoughts in order to maintain a sense of safety at home or abroad, and in order to benefit us as well as those voicing such prejudices.

Why is that?

 

Please click here to read the entire article

#health #spirituality #prayer

Kate is interested in sharing blogs about the impact of prayer and spirituality on our health written by her colleagues.  As a Christian Science practitioner and teacher, Kate has experienced the power of prayer in her life as well as in the lives of others.  She is the media and legislative contact for Christian Science in Maryland. Kate can be contacted through Twitter @CScomMaryland and email at: maryland@compub.org

Identity – Seeing Yourself in a Spiritual Mirror, by Debra Chew

Posted by on Oct 17, 2016 in Blog | Comments Off on Identity – Seeing Yourself in a Spiritual Mirror, by Debra Chew

identity-spiritual-mirrorMany people seem to be fixated on and questioning their identity.  They question who they look and act like and what they have inherited by way of gene pools and DNA.  Debra Chew, a colleague and a writer who looks at the connection between thought, spirituality and wellness from a Christian Science perspective, offers a unique method of identifying oneself that is universal and applicable to ALL.  In this article, she shares her own personal experiences with her two daughters and her spiritual perspective on our true identity-acknowledging God as the real Father-Mother of us all.  Read this thought provoking article – perhaps you will discover who you really are!

It seems like many people these days are talking about “identity,” which can mean different things to different people.  Oscar Wilde said, “Be yourself; everyone else is already taken.”  But, just who is yourself? Is it that physical reflection in your mirror or even what you think about yourself?  Or could it be that your identity is spiritual?

Interestingly, I read a 2015 New York Times Magazine article, entitled The Year We Obsessed Over Identity.  The article cited the decade of technology when anyone can create any persona, or identity, and be protected in cyberspace.  Reality TV shows abound where experts can’t wait to make over homes, bodies, and lives.  And Wesley Morris wrote this long piece pointing out the emotional strains some people experience from searching for their true identity in all these many ways.

From time to time, we have probably all asked the question, “Who am I?”  For a long time, this was certainly the case with my two daughters, who are adopted.  They both knew who their biological mothers were, but had never known their biological fathers.  Additionally, one daughter was Hispanic (and 30 years ago there weren’t as many diverse families as there are today) so she always felt “different” as a black-eyed, dark-skinned daughter of blonde “parents.”

Through the years, that “unknown” aspect of who my daughters were sometimes led to anxiety, fear, coping issues, and even physical problems like Wesley Morris described in his article, because they didn’t have all the answers about who they identified with or as.

Please click here to read the entire article

#wellbeing #spirituality #prayer

Kate is interested in sharing blogs about the impact of prayer and spirituality on our health written by her colleagues.  As a Christian Science practitioner and teacher, Kate has experienced the power of prayer in her life as well as in the lives of others.  She is the media and legislative contact for Christian Science in Maryland. Kate can be contacted through Twitter @CScomMaryland and email at: maryland@compub.org

Does the human mind have the power to heal us? by Van Driessen

Posted by on Oct 10, 2016 in Blog | Comments Off on Does the human mind have the power to heal us? by Van Driessen

Many in the medical and psychiatric research field feel that the human brain has the ability to heal.  In this article, Van Driessen, a colleague and writer that focuses on spirituality and health from his perspective as a Christian Science practitioner, explores this thought provoking subject.  He shares his spiritual insight on the ability of a universal consciousness- that is purely spiritual – that can and does heal.  Van offers research and an extraordinary testimony by a renowned neurosurgeon, as viable evidence that prayer does have the power to heal ourselves and others. This blog is on my must read list-I hope it will be on yours!

Some in the medical and psychiatric research fields have been saying that the human mind enables us to heal ourselves. A good example of this type of thinking is Bruce Lipton, Ph.D., stem cell biologist and author of several science books.  In a recent video on his website he says, “When we change our thoughts, behaviors, and beliefs, we can change our biology. We are the masters of our lives not the victim of our genes.”

Good thoughts are certainly beneficial. But do the good thoughts that heal have their source in the human mind or in something more all encompassing and universal?  Weighing against the notion of the human mind as a healing force are situations where one is unconscious or unable to think clearly and yet experiences mental healing. Consider the experience of neurosurgeon Eben Alexander, author of Proof of Heaven: A Neurosurgeon’s Journey into the Afterlife.

Alexander had been diagnosed as having a disease that shut down his brain activity, and he was in a coma for seven days. Brain scans indicated no ability to think. The prognosis was that he had a slim chance of surviving and an even worse chance of being able to function normally if he did survive. But, he did awake from the coma and fully recovered.

In his book, Alexander says that, while in the coma, he felt unconditional love and acceptance from an all-loving Divine Being and a sense of being forever part of this divine presence. This awareness deepened the longer he was in this presence, and it brought him great peace. He also said that although he appeared to others to be in a coma, he began to feel and recognize the effects of the prayers of his family and fellow Christian church members.

Finally, Alexander said that he had an intuition, more like a message, that he was going back. Shortly after that he opened his eyes, sat up and said: “all is well.” It took another week or so for a full return to normalcy.

It seems to me that this healing came as a result of a divine influence, that brought to him a greater sense of the love of God and his permanent place in this infinite Love. And my sense is that the love of the family and church members and their prayers were expressions of this divine influence.

Who wouldn’t want to feel the unconditional love of the Divine Being? How do we move toward feeling this divine love in our lives?  Christian author Mary Baker Eddy, a sincere student of the Bible, experienced the healing love of God in her life and healed others through her understanding of this love as a divine Principle.  In her primary work, Science and Health with Key to the Scriptures, she discusses how to access divine Love. She writes: “What we most need is the prayer of fervent desire for growth in grace, expressed in patience, meekness, love, and good deeds.” In other words, one way to feel more of divine Love is to desire and then to live more of that love of Love in our daily lives.

Perhaps the inability of the human mind to heal us is most obvious when we feel stuck in behavior we know is not good. When we’ve exhausted what we know to do, don’t we reach out intuitively to a power higher and wiser than ourselves to help us move forward? For example, Tad Blake-Weber was addicted to marijuana and wanted to stop. He found help through prayer and felt that the insights he needed came from a divine source. He explains: “I could see that God’s love includes the joy, bliss, and spiritual understanding we all yearn for.” He was freed from the addiction and moved forward to help others through what he was learning.

These life experiences give us hints of a divine influence that is always present to aid us. And this aid came in the form of a better understanding of the nature of God as Love. To me, seeking this better understanding is a direction we can all walk in.

As the media and legislative liaison for Christian Science for the State of New York, I write about spirituality and health from my perspective as a Christian Science practitioner. I enjoy connecting with health reporters and editors to learn what they have found regarding the impact of thought and consciousness on health, and to share what I’ve learned through my years of experience in helping many people find healing through prayer. I loved being an active part of my children growing up years, and now enjoy my work and when possible being outside participating in life (usually with my wife) biking, walking, jogging, roller blading, and avoiding the cars in my midtown Manhattan neighborhood.

http://www.nyspirit.com/mind/human-mind-power-heal-us/

Does the human mind have the capacity to heal us?, by Van Driessen

Posted by on Oct 10, 2016 in Blog | Comments Off on Does the human mind have the capacity to heal us?, by Van Driessen

Many in the medical and psychiatric research field feel that the human brain has the ability to heal.  In this article, Van Driessen, a colleague and writer that focuses on spirituality and health from his perspective as a Christian Science practitioner, explores this thought provoking subject.  He shares his spiritual insight on the ability of a universal consciousness- that is purely spiritual – that can and does heal.  Van offers research and an extraordinary testimony by a renowned neurosurgeon, as viable evidence that prayer does have the power to heal ourselves and others. This blog is on my must read list-I hope it will be on yours!

mental healing- brain or MindSome in the medical and psychiatric research fields have been saying that the human mind enables us to heal ourselves. A good example of this type of thinking is Bruce Lipton, Ph.D., stem cell biologist and author of several science books.  In a recent video on his website he says, “When we change our thoughts, behaviors, and beliefs, we can change our biology. We are the masters of our lives not the victim of our genes.”

Good thoughts are certainly beneficial. But do the good thoughts that heal have their source in the human mind or in something more all encompassing and universal?  Weighing against the notion of the human mind as a healing force are situations where one is unconscious or unable to think clearly and yet experiences mental healing. Consider the experience of neurosurgeon Eben Alexander, author of Proof of Heaven: A Neurosurgeon’s Journey into the Afterlife.

Alexander had been diagnosed as having a disease that shut down his brain activity, and he was in a coma for seven days. Brain scans indicated no ability to think. The prognosis was that he had a slim chance of surviving and an even worse chance of being able to function normally if he did survive. But, he did awake from the coma and fully recovered.

In his book, Alexander says that, while in the coma, he felt unconditional love and acceptance from an all-loving Divine Being and a sense of being forever part of this divine presence. This awareness deepened the longer he was in this presence, and it brought him great peace. He also said that although he appeared to others to be in a coma, he began to feel and recognize the effects of the prayers of his family and fellow Christian church members.

Please click here to read the entire article

#health #spirituality #prayer

Kate is interested in sharing blogs about the impact of prayer and spirituality on our health written by her colleagues.  As a Christian Science practitioner and teacher, Kate has experienced the power of prayer in her life as well as in the lives of others.  She is the media and legislative contact for Christian Science in Maryland. Kate can be contacted through Twitter @CScomMaryland and email at: maryland@compub.org